Sur­pris­ingly so­cia­ble

World of Animals - - All About Do­mes­tic Cats -

Cats have highly flex­i­ble so­cial lives. They’re usu­ally con­tent with­out the com­pany of oth­ers of their species, but they’re not as an­ti­so­cial as they’re of­ten de­picted. Rel­a­tives, un­re­lated cats and even other an­i­mals can be ac­cepted as com­pan­ions in the house, and those that are al­lowed to ven­ture out­side can form re­la­tion­ships with their neigh­bours. In­ter­ac­tions be­tween cats in neigh­bour­ing ter­ri­to­ries can be hostile, but friend­ships can form too.

To in­crease their chance of sur­vival, feral cats of­ten form large so­cial groups called colonies. They even co­op­er­ate to raise lit­ters, with mul­ti­ple fe­males putting their lit­ters in a sin­gle ‘nest’ and shar­ing their parental du­ties.

“In­ter­ac­tions be­tween cats in neigh­bour­ing ter­ri­to­ries can be hostile, but friend­ships can form”

Cats use lots of en­ergy when they’re awake and only sleeplightly, so they snooze for about two-thirds of the day

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