An­ticor­rup­tion courts work well in many na­tions

Kyiv Post Legal Quarterly - - Contents - By Josh Koven­sky koven­sky@kyivpost.com

Raise your hand if your coun­try has an anti-cor­rup­tion court?

There aren’t many — only around 20 coun­tries in the world have the spe­cial­ized in­sti­tu­tion, which is meant to pro­vide a fast and in­de­pen­dent ju­di­cial track for cor­rup­tion cases in na­tions whose jus­tice sys­tems have been com­pro­mised by graft.

And that’s what Pres­i­dent Petro Poroshenko asked a room of as­sem­bled for­eign dig­ni­taries and in­vestors at the an­nual Yalta Euro­pean Strat­egy con­fer­ence in Kyiv on Sept. 15.

He then started to list coun­tries like Kenya and Uganda, im­ply­ing that the sys­tem has been in­ef­fec­tive there.

“Where do anti-cor­rup­tion courts ex­ist? In

In­done­sia's for­mer Con­sti­tu­tional Court chief jus­tice lis­tens dur­ing his trial in Jakarta on Feb. 20, 2014, where he faced charges of bribery and money laun­der­ing in con­nec­tion with dis­puted lo­cal elec­tions. Kyiv ad­vo­cates of a spe­cial­ized anti-cor­rup­tion court point to In­done­sia as a suc­cess story, where a separate court man­aged to jail nu­mer­ous top of­fi­cials for cor­rup­tion. (AFP)

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