Ukraini­ans set sev­eral odd records

Kyiv Post - - Lifestyle - WITH MARIYA KAPINOS KAPINOS@KYIVPOST.COM

Peo­ple love be­ing the best at some­thing. The Ukrainian Book of Records is proof. Every year since 1989, up to 400 new records are added. Some of them are quite sur­pris­ing.

Ok­sana Shyka­lyuk’s record is among them. In 2010, she set the record for hav­ing the long­est nat­u­ral eye­lashes. They are 18.5 mil­lime­ters long, while the av­er­age length of a hu­man eye­lash is 10 mil­lime­ters.

Another hair- re­lated record was set by Khrystyna Krechkivska, who could be dubbed Ukraine’s Ra­pun­zel. In June 2016 she set the record for hav­ing the long­est hair in Ukraine, at 2.45 me­ters. The world record is held by Xie Qi­up­ing from China at 5.62 me­ters, mea­sured on May 8, 2004.

Nadiya Shcherban is in the Ukrainian Book of Records for hav­ing the largest nat­u­ral breasts. Scherban puts her size K breasts down to ge­net­ics, say­ing all of the women in her fam­ily have been big-breasted.

Some Ukraini­ans had to be quite cre­ative to get into the book. De­signer Dmytro Parhom­chuk from Lutsk set a record in 2015 by mak­ing a dress out of cof­fee beans. He used 26,667 cof­fee beans to sew the dress, which weighs 4.5 kilo­grams and has a match­ing purse and shoes, also made with cof­fee beans.

Tatyana Kaluzhna, a jew­eler from Donetsk, in 2013 pro­duced a miner’s pro­tec­tive hel­met from gold, sil­ver and gems. It was recorded as the most ex­pen­sive miner’s hel­met in Ukraine, with a value of $43,000. That’s enough to buy at least 25,000 reg­u­lar hel­mets.

Other re­mark­able head­wear: Kyiv res­i­dents in 2013 built a gi­ant hat — 4.5 me­ters in di­am­e­ter — from 150 kilo­grams of ply­wood. There was space enough in­side to fit over 25 peo­ple.

The peo­ple of Kh­mel­nyt­sky have their own record: In 2014, they re­leased 18,000 Chi­nese lanterns into the evening sky. To light them up, the or­ga­niz­ers handed out about 20,000 boxes of matches to par­tic­i­pants.

Mean­while, the peo­ple of Ternopil got them­selves into the record book in 2014 by set­ting up a 210.6-me­ter-long bar­beque. The record re­quired

300 kilo­grams of pork and 20 cooks to pre­pare the meat. The pre­vi­ous record was held by Kyiv, with a 160-me­ter-long bar­be­cue — equiv­a­lent to the height of a 50-story build­ing.

The city of Kher­son is also in the book, for the largest num­ber of peo­ple si­mul­ta­ne­ously drink­ing yo­ghurt. In 2014, 1,144 marathon run­ners set the record right af­ter the run -- pro­mot­ing the health ben­e­fits of dairy prod­ucts in the process.

Set­ting records some­times re­quires a lot of brav­ery and strength.

Yevhen Kalinin from Odesa in 2014 fol­lowed U.S. ac­tor Jean-Claude Van Damme’s ex­am­ple and for al­most 90 sec­onds man­aged to per­form splits be­tween two sports cars mov­ing at a speed of 20 kilo­me­ters per hour.

Painter and zoo owner Olek­sander Pylyshenko from Za­por­izhzhya took 35 days to set his record. That’s how long he lived in a cage with a pair of African lions. The liv­ing con­di­tions were the same for Pysarenko and the an­i­mals: They slept on wooden floor­boards and had all their food given to them through the bars of the cage. Dur­ing his stay, Pylyshenko com­pleted 13 paint­ings and wit­nessed the birth of two baby lions. Pylyshenko said he wanted “to demon­strate that un­der­stand­ing be­tween hu­man be­ings and lions is easy to at­tain.”

Ukrainian strong­woman Olga Li­aschuk skipped Ukraine’s Book of Records and went straight to the Guin­ness Book of World Records. She set her record in 2014, crush­ing three wa­ter­mel­ons be­tween her thighs in 14.65 sec­onds.

Ukrainian strong­woman Olga Li­aschuk made it to the Gui­ness Book of World Records in 2014 by crush­ing three wa­ter­mel­ons be­tween her thights in 14.65 sec­onds. (Kostyan­tyn Ch­er­nichkin)

Za­por­izhzhya painter and zoo owner Olek­sander Pylyshenko made it to the Ukrainian Book of Records by liv­ing in a cage with a pair of African lions for 35 days. (Ukrin­form)

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