“There is a huge amount of po­ten­tial in Ukraine, but I fear that as in the past, that po­ten­tial will be stopped and stymied by the en­trenched po­lit­i­cal/busi­ness in­ter­ests”

Han­nah Thoburn, a Re­search Fel­low at the Hud­son In­sti­tute, where she fo­cuses on Rus­sia, Ukraine, East­ern Euro­pean pol­i­tics, and the tran­sat­lantic re­la­tion­ship, Washington

The Ukrainian Week - - NEIGHBOURS -

Ukraine has grown by leaps and bounds in the past four years. It may not be where it – or the West – wants it to be, but the moves for­ward and changes in mind­set are pal­pa­ble. There is a huge amount of po­ten­tial in Ukraine, but I fear that as in the past, that po­ten­tial will be stopped and stymied by the en­trenched po­lit­i­cal/busi­ness in­ter­ests that also ex­ist in Ukraine. Be­cause of that dy­namic, true lead­er­ship is still lack­ing in Ukraine and holds the coun­try back.

To stay in­formed about what is hap­pen­ing through­out Ukraine on any given day, I use a wide va­ri­ety of sources. I

use Face­book and Twit­ter to com­mu­ni­cate with old friends and pro­fes­sional con­nec­tions, as well as to read the state­ments of some Ukrainian politi­cians and to keep up with the lat­est, break­ing news about events in Ukraine. Re­ports from Ukrainian think tanks, var­i­ous polling sources – es­pe­cially IRI's polls, Ukrainian gov­ern­ment web­sites that pub­lish speeches and sta­tis­tics, and the daily re­ports from the OSCE are all very use­ful. The web­sites of lo­cal news­pa­pers are also use­ful – though they of­ten lack key de­tails – as are lo­cal blog­gers. Ac­cess to in­for­ma­tion about his­tor­i­cal events (pre-1991) is rather harder, but im­prov­ing all the time.

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