Толь­ко раз в го­ду

VOGUE UA - - ОТЕЛЬ -

В се­мье фран­цуз­ских ре­сто­ра­нов Famille Très FRANÇAIS в де­каб­ре сра­зу два име­нин­ни­ка: ре­сто­ра­ны Très Français и Très Branché

«ПРАЗД­НИЧ­НОЕ МЕ­НЮ ПО­ЯВИТ­СЯ СРА­ЗУ в Двух НА­ШИХ РЕ­СТО­РА­НАХ»

де­кабрь для нас каж­дый раз по­лу­ча­ет­ся са­мым важ­ным ме­ся­цем в го­ду, – со­об­ща­ет вла­де­ли­ца се­мьи фран­цуз­ских ре­сто­ра­нов Famille Très FRANÇAIS На­та­лия Не­вя­дом­ская и спе­шит разъ­яс­нить: – Оба за­ве­де­ния мы от­кры­ли в де­каб­ре, и те­перь от­ме­ча­ем их дни рож­де­ния: 18 де­каб­ря вы­пьем за бла­го­по­лу­чие глав­но­го ре­сто­ра­на и сыр­ной лав­ки Très Français, ко­то­ро­му ис­пол­нит­ся че­ты­ре, а 25-го стук­нет год на­ше­му «млад­шень­ко­му» Très Branché. Как все­гда, на­ша ко­ман­да го­то­вит для го­стей мас­су сюр­при­зов и по­дар­ков, а так­же при­гла­ша­ет в ку­ли­нар­ную шко­лу. А за га­стро­но­ми­че­ские удо­воль­ствия – спе­ци­аль­ное ме­ню – в от­ве­те шеф-по­ва­ра обо­их за­ве­де­ний». Их празд­нич­ный сет пред­ла­га­ет: теп­лый овощ­ной миль­фей с ли­сич­ка­ми и тра­ва­ми, рол­лы из мяг­ко­го сы­ра реб­ло­шон, тар­тар из тун­ца с са­ла­том фри­зе и ман­го­вым мус­сом, ути­ное фи­ле с фуа-гра и спар­жей в виш­не­вом со­усе, пю­ре из щу­ки с ар­ма­нья­ком в па­ре с ко­киль Сен-жак с ги­бис­ку­сом и фрук­то­вый де­серт в шо­ко­лад­ной гла­зу­ри.

Ediror’s Letter

It was not a gift for New Year. Or any other occasion for that matter. It was just that we were working on Vogue Man, and I couldn’t help falling in love with a men’s brooch from the Choice column. My man has a fantastic sense of style: dandyism would be an accurate enough characterization of his suits. Once he complained to me though he couldn’t find the right jewellery to go with them – rings do not feel right on his fingers, and they are basically all a man has as a way of decoration. And as luck would have it, here in Vogue I saw men’s juniper twig brooches by Velar to be worn on a lapel. A piece of jewellery for those keen on suits – that was some seriously good luck. I was so happy I instantly emailed designer Polina Velar. Together, we developed a real secret service «Brooch» operation. Polina is proud to call herself a Ukrainian designer and Kiev patriot (this specific brooch is by the way an homage to the old Botanic Garden in Kiev), but is currently based in Berlin. Velar did not plan to come to Kiev, and I wasn’t going to Berlin, but in the end we managed to meet – in Paris during the Fashion Week. I dreamt of a night I would give the brooch to my man. It would have to be at some fine dining venue, so he would be wearing one of his gorgeous suits. And I would give him a box (I even found a carved silver box for the occasion – a velvet one would have never done), he would be stunned speechless and would immediately pin it to a lapel. Meanwhile, as I was waiting for the right dinner at the right restaurant, our supplement for men was published, and I brought it home. It was just another ordinary evening, we were sitting at the table, he was on the phone discussing some serious issues, leafing through Vogue Man at the same time. He was looking through the pages, signaling to me: the cover is great, printed suits look weird, a double-breasted coat is excellent, silver shoes are a no. He finally reached the page with the brooch. He pointed at it, made a terrible face, shook his head vigorously and snorted with contempt. For a moment, I couldn’t see a thing. No other image in the magazine had caused such a violent reaction of obvious disgust. He continued arguing on the phone, and I came up to the mirror to check if my face had turned puce with perspiration on my forehead. It couldn’t be helped – I had to come clean then and there, because it would have been a hundred times worse if I had waited and given the brooch later. I promised myself I wouldn’t cry, put the box on the table – and burst into tears. We spent that evening in tears and each other’s arms. My brilliant plan didn’t work out, and he is never going to wear this twig brooch on his lapel – but I don’t mind, because I now have my own version of O. Henry’s The Gift of the Magi to tell. And a memory of an unbearably awkward moment, which brought such a sweet feeling of intimacy that is just not possible when everything is perfect. I wish you all the «right» New Year gifts. But even if they turn out wrong, may they lead to something truly beautiful instead.

True colours

This December, Jamala will present her new album Podykh in Kiev. Masha Tsukanova has spent a day with the singer as she is preparing for the show. «I won’t be in Kiev before the 24th, and on the 27th I have a concert. I mean it will have to be the 25th or 26th», we meet with Jamala at the Liubimyi Diadia restaurant to discuss a date for a photo shoot for the Vogue Ukraine December issue. For the signer with an extremely busy schedule, it is unimaginable luxury to agree to a day-long photo-shoot. We are having brunch at the Liubimyi Diadia. Yesterday, Podykh was released. Jamala does not believe in old-fashioned presentations with speeches and cocktails, that’s why she chose to gather closest friends to unveil her album during a live show at the Aristocrats online radio she has been friends with for a while now. She celebrated the occasion with her closest people too: her producer Igor Tarnopolsky invited the whole team (15 people) over to his place and cooked dinner for them. Being Muslim, Jamala didn’t have anything to drink, but after the late-night house party at her producer’s she still looks a bit sleepy. And relaxed: she’s wearing a pair of jeans and a vintage style Pull & Bear sweater, a Topshop Unique trench coat with a Bohemian Rose fringe bag. But even casually dressed, Jamala looks immaculate with perfectly styled glossy hair and her signature eyeliner. Jamala is artistic, emotional and can change dramatically in a nanosecond. With a waiter, she is a pretty damsel in distress; turning back to her conversation with Vogue editors, she laughs, gesticulating madly, telling us excitedly about street musicians she met in Portugal; and, quite unexpectedly, returns disappointed, on the verge of tears after an unpleasant work-related phone call. You can’t predict what this woman will do next: I began my brunch with one version of Jamala and finished it with a totally different person. Jamala speaks a lot and with obvious pleasure about her family. Her defining characteristics –religion and nationality (Jamala’s real name is Susana Jamaladinova, she is half Armenian, half Crimean Tatar), unique among Ukrainian musicians, come from her parents, as well as her intrinsic, chthonic sense of music: her father and mother, both with academic training in music, taught little Jamala and her elder sister Evelina deep respect for music. «I hate this idea of «self-made”: it is absolutely wrong. What «self-made» are you talking about? Let’s start from the beginning: who your parents, your school and musical school teachers were, what competitions you took part in, what feedback you had from ordinary people – they all contributed to your development.» Jamala is blushing with pleasure as she speaks about her mom, who refused to listen to Podykh before she finished all her household chores and could give it her undivided attention because «this music is not meant for the kitchen». At night, she texted her daughter, «It’s genius». Jamala is a patriot of both, Ukraine and Ukrainian fashion: she knows all the local labels, even the smallest ones like «Who is it?», she can be often seen wearing clothes by Ukrainian designers at different functions, choosing, instead of safe, neutral little black dresses, the boldest, most symbolic and characteristic models – brands’ signature designs. The proverbial honor and conscience don’t let Jamala use designers’ love and take their clothes for free, «I always pay for

the clothes, that’s my decision. I want designers to feel support.» Her other current passion is Native Americans. Even for her photo shoot for Vogue Ukraine Jamala insists on an Indian hair style. «The Indian theme reflects our time quite accurately: to some extent, we all fight for our people, religion and beliefs. We all are more or less Indians. I love being myself when everybody says it’s wrong, it’s outdated, nobody wears or says that anymore.» Most of the songs from her new album Podykh are in Ukrainian. It was done intentionally. Her successful singing career started some six years ago when in 2009 Jamala won the New Wave contest and became famous, but she’s dreaming of massive radio rotations and big stadium concerts, which are not likely to happen in Ukraine with English songs. «I keep telling myself I create music for me, but still wait for some reaction from people. It is not right, of course. You do what you do because you love it.» But it’s not only about people’s reaction. Jamala is a musician with classic and jazz training, and she was eager to «play a trick» – sing soul in Ukrainian. She wrote her songs in Ukrainian, hoping the words would sound like the beat of a drum – and they do.

A pair of weirdos

The eccentric Lithuanian duo Beissoul & Einius first became known in Ukraine at the end of 2014, when the already popular European electronic musicians, unknown in Ukraine though, played an opening act for The Hardkiss. The dynamic duo stunned the audience with a high-voltage show bigger bands would have envied, all thanks to the frontman’s unusual voice, unconventional costumes and surreal dancing. There are a lot of good musicians around us, but not every one of them is a real artist. Few find this balance between music, show and the image you create for the world to see – it is mostly those interested in things outside music that manage to do so. Beissoul & Einius are undoubtedly artists: watching them perform, looking at their concert costumes, accessories and photo shoots is just as interesting as listening to their music. Beissoul, who’s been in love with fashion since he was a child, is the one behind the duo’s looks and performances. He is one of those people normally referred to as fashion addicts. Beissoul is both the band’s frontman and stylist: he designs most of the costumes and unimaginable hats the musicians wear at their shows. A long fur coat, a rococo-style red velvet jacket with golden motifs, a lacquered leather turban – imagination coupled with interest in fashion trends results in a quaint, grotesque, yet sophisticated style. Beissoul honestly calls the process of finding the right costumes as hunting: he buys the stuff he doesn’t design himself in vintage stores. His friends contribute quite a lot too, sending him suitable outfits from all over the world. «I once got a parcel, opened it only to find huge horns and a mask inside. What shall I do with them? After some consideration I made a hat». The duo’s favourite Ukrainian designer is Elena Burenina. She saw them at The Hardkiss show and was shocked that these world-class musicians served as an opening act. Elena became close friends with the duo, designing a number of concert costumes for them. In fact, her Chamillion fall/winter 2015–16 collection was inspired by the Lithuanian musicians and their new eponymous album. Soon, Burenina promises, she is going to create new looks for the duo, which, she hopes, will help the Lithuanian artists become an international success. This month, the musicians promise their Ukrainian fans a breath of fresh air – a show at the Atlas club. The duo will present their new album Chamillion, saying their music will become harder and outfits more ironic.

Christmas dinner time

With the holiday season upon us, restaurateur Maria Kovtun remembers what was on her childhood holiday menu and shares new Christmas recipes In my childhood, popular Soviet holiday dishes made their appearance on a New Year’s table, including Olivier (aka Russian salad), Shuba (dressed herring), Mimosa (layered tuna) salads, tomato marinated fish, jellied pike with mushrooms, raw smoked sausages, roast duck with apple stuffing and, without fail, a cake – a honey cake or my mom’s specialty – Vostochny cake. Oh, and tangerines – a Soviet-style New Year’s Eve party was unthinkable without them! We still put on our best outfits, decorate the holiday table and cook the best, most delicious and ornate, dishes for holidays. There is one slight difference though: it is us now that dress up as Santa and are responsible for gifts. In all the amazing years of my life, full of new encounters and travelling, I have accumulated countless exciting stories, culinary tips and, naturally, recipes. Once in Spain, we had a true «king» on our Christmas table – a pink-sided suckling pig, adorned lavishly as a Christmas tree, stuffed with buckwheat, mushrooms and chicken liver. An absolutely irresistible treat. I was amazed at how soft and tender the meat tasted. This summer in Provence, France, I met Daniel Humm, Chef of the Eleven Madison Park restaurant in New York City. He told me that back in his home country of Lichtenstein nine out of ten households have «Chinese fondue» for Christmas with vegetable or mushroom broth used instead of cheese. Thinly shaved raw meat and sauces are served separately. In good old France, which I love dearly, they often cook Cervelle de сanut (Silk Weaver’s Brain) for Christmas, which is a ridiculously delicious dip from Lyon made from fresh cheese, herbs and garlic. Cervelle de сanut is traditionally served with toast or roast potatoes and tastes best with red Beaujolais or white Chardonnay. This New Year’s Eve is sure to see some of my childhood favourites – Olivier and Shuba salads, aspic, herring and pickles, as well as some novelties – sublime duck and fig, Roquefort and pear tarts, foie gras parfait, salads with fresh herbs, fish dishes, and smoked salmon soufflé. Some homemade bread and most definitely a big 8-kilo Madame Turkey with apple, quince and foie gras stuffing. For myself, I’ll ask Santa for the best Spanish sherry Pedro Ximenez for dessert. Bouillabaisse, a perfect hangover remedy, will be waiting for me in the morning – I’ll just have to ladle it out.

Très Branché ис­пол­ня­ет­ся все­го

год, а ощу­ще­ние, что он ра­бо­тал все­гда

Вла­де­ли­ца се­мьи ре­сто­ра­нов Famille Très FRANÇAIS На­та­лия Не­вя­дом­ская

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