Drift Along the Ocean by Moon­light

amuse your­self in the is­land’s buzzing din­ing rooms and lively lo­cales.

101 Things to Do (Maui) - - Contents -

81. LEARN HAWAI‘I HORSE TALES

It’s ar­guably one of Maui’s most unique shows. NA LIO is an en­gag­ing retelling of the his­tory of Hawai‘i and horses.

Many don’t know about the legacy the Span­ish left va­que­ros in Hawai‘i. They gifted with ali‘i horses (and cows). They trained the (Hawai‘i cowboys). pan­iolo To­day, one can trace a di­rect line from mod­ern pan­iolo to those va­que­ros from so long ago. When they left the is­lands, the va­que­ros gave their gui­tars to their Hawai­ian hosts. From this, slack-key gui­tar was born. Na Lio (“The Horses”) tells this uniquely Hawai­ian story from its gor­geous, West Maui set­ting as the sun sinks be­low the hori­zon. Travel back in time and be en­ter­tained by ex­cel­lent horse­man­ship, and slack-key hula mu­sic by the leg­endary, Grammy Award-win­ner, Ge­orge Kahumoku, Jr. For more in­for­ma­tion on this en­thralling per­for­mance ex­pe­ri­ence, visit naliomaui.com.

82. PICK UP AN ‘UKULELE

In­spired by Ed­die Ved­der’s

? Or maybe you ‘Ukulele Songs fancy your­self to be the next Jake Shimabukuro, or just want to be able to strum along to songs such as “Sit­ting, Wait­ing, Wish­ing” by Jack John­son, “Some­where Over The Rain­bow” by Is­rael Ka­makawiwo‘ole or the peren­nial fa­vorite “‘Ukulele Lady.” Ei­ther way, you’re in luck.

shops like BOUNTY MU­SIC, a ‘Ukulele family owned busi­ness es­tab­lished on Maui in 1979, has the ex­pe­ri­ence and in­ven­tory to help you find the best ‘ukulele for you.

As for the his­tory of the ‘ukulele (pro­nounced “oo-koo-leh-leh,” not “you-ka-lay-lee”), the stringed in­stru­ment ac­tu­ally came to Hawai‘i with Por­tuguese im­mi­grants in the late 1800s along with other is­land fa­vorites like MALASADAS and SWEET

BREAD. Since then, the ‘ukulele has been a key part of kanikapila (back­yard jam ses­sions) and pop­u­lar Hawai­ian tunes.

Strum the four strings for your­self at Bounty Mu­sic, where you can pur­chase an ‘ukulele to bring home or rent one for a day of is­land en­ter­tain­ment. While you’re at it, pe­ruse a va­ri­ety of other in­stru­ments and learn more about lo­cal mu­sic styles from the store’s ex­perts. Bounty Mu­sic is lo­cated at 111 Hana High­way in Kahu­lui, (808) 871-1141.

83. SAM­PLE A SWEET TASTE OF THE IS­LANDS

Hawai‘i is a great place for all sorts of peo­ple, in­clud­ing those with a sweet tooth. With a mul­ti­cul­tural his­tory and pop­u­la­tion to pull from, SWEET OF­FER­INGS of the is­lands vary from well-known op­tions like SHAVE ICE to treats like crispy . If manju you’re look­ing for some­thing a lit­tle more fun than a key­chain to take home to friends, con­sider pack­ing up one of these treats:

• GURI GURI: This pop­u­lar icy treat is akin to a slushier, sweeter ver­sion of shaved ice. It is so good that peo­ple have even been known to pack it on ice and suc­cess­fully fly it back home with them. Try it for your­self at TASAKA GURI GURI SHOP at the Maui Mall in Kahu­lui, (808) 871-4513. • CRISPY MANJU: Al­most like a minia­ture pie, HOME MAID BAK­ERY’S crispy manju is a flaky crust wrapped around an is­land-style va­ri­ety of fillings, from Ok­i­nawan sweet potato to bean (a azuki sweet red bean paste). Lo­cated in Wailuku (1005 Lower Main St., 808-224-7015) • PAS­TRIES, MALASADAS AND MOLOKA‘I SWEET BREAD: One of Maui’s most pop­u­lar places for pas­tries is T KOMODA STORE AND BAK­ERY, which in­cludes giant cream puffs and tasty malasadas (a type of Por­tuguese treat sim­i­lar to a donut). You can also try great malasadas at Home Maid Bak­ery. And if you’re hop­ping over to Moloka‘i, sam­ple some of the fa­mous Moloka‘i bread, along with other tasty baked goods, at KANEMITSU’S BAK­ERY. T Komoda Store and Bak­ery is lo­cated at

PHOTO: HAWAII TOURISM AUTHOR­ITY (HTA) / MAX WANGER LO­CA­TION: WAILUKU

SAM­PLE A SWEET TASTE OF THE IS­LANDS

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