1967 JEEPSTER COM­MANDO

PATINA AND RACE CAR PARTS

4 Wheel & Off Road - - CONTENTS - Harry Wag­ner BY EDI­TOR@4WOR.COM PHO­TOG­RA­PHY HARRY WAG­NER

Patina and race car parts.

1 The all-alu­minum L92 engine came out of a De­nali and gen­er­ates ap­prox­i­mately 525 hp with af­ter­mar­ket valve springs and a cam. Brian Shirley wanted the engine topped with an oil bath air cleaner from a 1948 Ford truck to pro­vide a more vin­tage look than a com­pos­ite in­take man­i­fold.

2 The front sus­pen­sion is a three-link with a Pan­hard bar. Tribe 4x4 built the lower links from 2-inch alu­minum and capped them with

11⁄4-inch greasable FK rod ends. King 21⁄2-inch­di­am­e­ter coilover shocks are com­ple­mented by King 3-inch by­pass shocks to let Shirley go as fast as he wants in the dirt.

JEEPSTERS ARE POP­U­LAR THESE days. The pur­chase price is low, the wheel­base is per­fect for most trail use, and the look is dis­tinctly vin­tage. These are the fac­tors that mo­ti­vated Brian Shirley to turn this 1967 Jeepster Com­mando into the ul­ti­mate Ul­tra4 pre­run­ner.

Hav­ing pur­chased the Jeepster in a field in Ok­la­homa for the pal­try sum of $2,200, Shirley dropped it off at Tribe 4x4 in Fort Worth, Texas, where Adam Scherer and his crew per­formed a full makeover. Dubbed “the Sleepster,” there is not much left of the orig­i­nal Jeepster un­der the weath­ered sheet­metal.

Shirley is a long­time rock racer, and his son Levi is car­ry­ing on that tra­di­tion as one of the pre­mier driv­ers in King of the Ham­mers and the Ul­tra4 se­ries. The Sleepster uses many of the same com­po­nents that the Shirleys have re­lied on in com­pe­ti­tion, such as the Spi­der9 axles, ARB Air Lock­ers, King shocks, and Maxxis tires. But in­stead of hav­ing to crawl over a door bar, the Sleepster is com­fort­able to get in and out of, has air con­di­tion­ing, and is just as at home on the street as it is in the rocks. That is a win­ning com­bi­na­tion re­gard­less of the sheet­metal it is found un­der.

“It is ba­si­cally a race car”

4

The in­te­rior fea­tures headed PRP En­dura re­clin­ing seats with faux ostrich vinyl, a race ra­dio, a full stereo, cruise con­trol, a tilt steer­ing wheel, and even air con­di­tion­ing. Shirley mon­i­tors the engine’s vitals through the Ra­cepak gauge clus­ter, and a shifter from a Mal­ibu rows the 6L80E trans­mis­sion from Zero Grav­ity Trans­mis­sions, which is mated to the Ad­vance Adapters At­las II trans­fer case.

5

The front axle is a Spi­der­trax Spi­der9 with a

10-inch Gear­works high-pin­ion dif­fer­en­tial filled with 6.20 gears and an ARB Air Locker that mate to 35-spline Spi­der­trax axle shafts. PSC pro­vided all of the steer­ing com­po­nents, in­clud­ing the Sag­i­naw-style box, pump, reser­voir, and hy­draulic as­sist ram.

6

Out back, Tribe 4x4 trussed the Spi­der9 axle be­fore load­ing it with a high-pin­ion Gear­works 10-inch third mem­ber with 6.20 gears and an ARB Air Locker. The 35-spline Spi­der­trax axle­shafts are used in the full-float­ing rearend, which is capped by light­weight Spi­der­trax disc brakes.

7

The rear sus­pen­sion uses tubu­lar trail­ing arms con­structed from 2-inch heat-treated chro­moly and tri­an­gu­lated up­per links to lo­cate the axle. King 21⁄2-inch coilovers and

3-inch by­pass coilovers and by­pass shocks are set up to work in any ter­rain from rock­crawl­ing to high-speed two-track to the pave­ment.

8

The rear body pan­els were re­moved to push the rear axle back and open the wheel­well up for the 40-inch tires. Chad Ma­hone painted the new skins to match the patina found on the orig­i­nal sheet­metal. Also vis­i­ble is the 16-gal­lon fuel tank that Tribe 4x4 built to fit be­tween the fram­erails.

3

1

2

5 6

8

4

7

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.