Re­mak­ing His­tory

An ef­fer­ves­cent, mid­cen­tury kitchen steals the show in this Eich­ler stun­ner.

Atomic Ranch - - Atomickitchens - By Shelby Deer­ing • Pho­tog­ra­phy by Mariko Reed

AT ITS HEIGHT, MID­CEN­TURY STYLE CAP­TI­VATED AMER­I­CANS AS THE PRE­VAIL­ING CHOICE FOR DE­SIGN-FOR­WARD HOMES. The mid mod look is once again sought af­ter and ap­pre­ci­ated by a new gen­er­a­tion of en­thu­si­asts who pay care­ful at­ten­tion to pe­riod de­tails and au­then­tic el­e­ments.

Some, such as the own­ers of this 1961 Joseph Eich­ler-built home, feel drawn to an hon­est rep­re­sen­ta­tion of the style not just for aes­thetic rea­sons, but also be­cause of a per­sonal con­nec­tion. The mother of one of the home­own­ers grew up in an Eich­ler house, and they wanted to bring that nos­tal­gia into their own home.

Lo­cated in Sun­ny­vale, Cal­i­for­nia, the home was art­fully re­freshed to be au­then­ti­cally Mid­cen­tury Mod­ern through­out–with spe­cial care paid to the kitchen, thanks to John Klopf and Ge­off Cam­pen of Kloft Ar­chi­tec­ture.

OPEN & INVIT­ING

At over fifty years old, the house re­quired some re­mod­el­ing to suit the cur­rent home­owner’s life­style. John Klopf ex­plains how they cre­ated the open kitchen.

“The clients were not fans of the sep­a­rated liv­ing ar­eas in the house. Be­fore the ad­di­tion, upon en­ter­ing the house, one turned left down a hall­way into a gal­ley kitchen that was closed off from other spa­ces. There was a din­ing room that was sep­a­rate from the kitchen and liv­ing room. We com­bined the mul­ti­ple small spa­ces into one large great room with the open kitchen.”

DIS­TINCTLY MID­CEN­TURY

To pre­serve the mid­cen­tury look, John and Ge­off high­lighted the orig­i­nal post-and-beam con­struc­tion. By open­ing up the great room, out­door views can now be en­joyed through the “wall of glass,” a com­mon fea­ture of Eich­ler homes.

“We up­dated the glass it­self, in­clud­ing re­plac­ing smaller slid­ing glass doors with 4-panel slid­ing glass doors that al­low more di­rect con­nec­tion be­tween in­doors and out­doors than in the orig­i­nal de­sign,” John says.

Other mid­cen­tury touches were added through wal­nut­toned cus­tom cab­i­netry by Kerf and a Cae­sar­stone coun­ter­top, an up­grade that is still vis­ually rem­i­nis­cent of the orig­i­nal Formica. Eames Molded Plas­tic Stools add punchy hues to the space, also seen in the open shelv­ing and ac­cents, cre­at­ing a fun and vi­brant set­ting.

John shares, “The own­ers love liv­ing in this house.”

“What makes this kitchen dif­fer­ent from other Mid­cen­tury Mod­ern re­mod­els is the play­ful cab­i­netry lay­out and col­ors against the warm wal­nut back­ground.”

THE KITCHEN ECHOES THE DECOR IN THE REST OF THE HOME THROUGH FLOW AND A CON­TI­NU­ITY OF MA­TE­RI­ALS THAT CRE­ATE A UNI­FORM EX­PE­RI­ENCE FROM ROOM TO ROOM. THE CON­CRETE TILES RUN THROUGH­OUT THE HOME, ALONG WITH THE WHITE-WASHED CEIL­ING DECKING AND POST-AND-BEAM STRUC­TURE.

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