CIVIC EN­GAGE­MENT CORRELATIVES WITH ACA­DEMIC ACHIEVE­MENT.

IT FOS­TERS COM­MU­NITY AC­TION.

Better Homes & Gardens - - Back to School -

“The in­ter­net and so­cial me­dia have been a use­ful tool for youth to mo­bi­lize and get the word out about is­sues that mat­ter to them,” says Ellen Mid­daugh, Ph.D., as­sis­tant pro­fes­sor of child and ado­les­cent de­vel­op­ment at San José State Uni­ver­sity. Whether teens are rais­ing money and sup­plies to help hur­ri­cane vic­tims and home­less youth or reg­is­ter­ing peo­ple to vote, the ben­e­fits go be­yond help­ing oth­ers. “Civic en­gage­ment gives youth a chance to feel like their voice mat­ters, re­in­forces a sense of iden­tity and pur­pose, and cre­ates con­nec­tions they can draw on in the fu­ture,” Mid­daugh says. Help guide kids by check­ing out youth-fo­cused sites like do­some­thing.org, which gives them a dig­i­tal plat­form to find causes they’re pas­sion­ate about and take ac­tion.

83% OF PAR­ENTSARE FRIENDSWITH THEIR TEENSON FACE­BOOK.

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