GRAND EN­TRANCE

With all roads lead­ing to the mud­room in in­te­rior de­signer Amanda Rey­nal’s home, she out­fit­ted the space to be both stor­age-savvy and smart-look­ing.

Better Homes & Gardens - - Organizing -

Go fig­ure that our home’s hard­est-work­ing spa­ces are also of­ten re­spon­si­ble for de­liv­er­ing first im­pres­sions. (We’re look­ing at you, mud­room.) “Peo­ple don’t re­ally use front doors any­more,” says Des Moines-based in­te­rior de­signer Amanda Rey­nal. “So when our friends come in the back door, our mud­room acts like a foyer.” With that re­al­ity in mind, she did the seem­ingly im­pos­si­ble: de­signed a space that stands up to the messes of her two teen boys and dog yet is a place fit to wel­come guests.

Don’t be deceived by the good looks. Soft gray (Ben­jamin Moore’s Re­vere Pewter) on the cus­tom built-ins and Pi­etra Car­dosa stone floor­ing in­set with quartz band­ing is only the face of hard­work­ing perime­ter stor­age and heated floors.

SIM­PLE STYLE

Lim­it­ing col­ors to grays and whites keeps the look un­clut­tered. “The mix of hard and soft, glossy and matte, and scale in pat­terns cre­ates vis­ual in­ter­est with­out re­ly­ing on color,” Amanda Rey­nal says. She also kept open stor­age (in­clud­ing a doggy bed, right) below eye level so noth­ing feels too util­i­tar­ian.

A LANTERN CHAN­DE­LIER GIVES THE MUD­ROOM MAIN-EN­TRYSTA­TUS.

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