COLOR

Better Homes & Gardens - - Contents -

Bold walls cre­ate in­stant wow fac­tor, yet many of us are afraid to com­mit to a strong paint color. De­signer Nick Olsen wants to help you take the plunge. “It’s just paint. It can al­ways be painted over, so go for it,” he says. Fol­low his tips and you’ll have a room that feels ex­cit­ing and invit­ing.

you’re ready to turn up the vol­ume but first you need a plan. “Pick a start­ing point, like a mul­ti­color rug or piece of art,” says New York de­signer Nick Olsen. Be brave and com­mit to paint­ing the bold­est hue from that item on the walls. For max­i­mum im­pact, Nick fa­vors us­ing the clear­est, most sat­u­rated ver­sion of the color. “Even if it’s not a bright color, the ones with less gray mixed in are strong­est,” he says. Next, layer in fur­nish­ings in dif­fer­ent col­ors from your in­spi­ra­tion piece. They don’t need to match ex­actly as long as they are in the same fam­ily. Mix­ing brighter and softer hues will cre­ate depth. Last, sur­round all that color with an am­ple amount of neu­trals like earth tones or black and white to give the eye a rest.

NEED BOLD BREATH­ING WALLSROOM. HERENICK OLSEN USEDNEU­TRAL BLACKAND WHITE TO TAMEROYAL BLUE. WALLMARCH WIND25-12 PRATT & LAM­BERT

CHAIR Chateau in Amethyst, $312 with code wis­te­ria20; wis­te­ria.com FLOW Carry a com­moncolor thread through ad­join­ingrooms. Here mint green and yel­low re­peat. LAMP Jade Green glass base, $60; White cot­ton linen shade, $20; world­mar­ket.com BAL­ANCE A room feels co­he­sive when dif­fer­ent val­uesare at play. Here a dark bur­gundy sofatem­pers the bright blue wall; small doses of vi­brant cit­rineadd con­trast.

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