Look on the Bright Side

10 Ways To Boost Your Mood Nat­u­rally

Better Nutrition - - CONTENTS - by Michele Burk­lund, ND

Com­ing down with a case of the blues? You’re not alone. An es­ti­mated 10 mil­lion Amer­i­cans suf fer from sea­sonal af fec tive order ( SAD)— de­clin­ing mood as the days get shorter. And like many health is­sues, preven­tion is key. Here are 10 easy ways to stop your blues be­fore they star t.

Com­ing down with a case of the blues? You’re not alone. It’s es­ti­mated that up to 10 per­cent of the pop­u­la­tion in the United States will show signs of a de­clin­ing mood as the days get shorter and the tem­per­a­tures drop.

A spe­cific type of mood dis­or­der that’s di­rectly re­lated to the change in sea­sons is com­monly known as SAD, or Sea­sonal Af­fec­tive Dis­or­der. SAD symp­toms usu­ally oc­cur in the au­tumn and win­ter months and in­clude tired­ness, feel­ings of hope­less­ness, overeat­ing, and loss of mo­ti­va­tion. Th­ese symp­toms can be more preva­lent in peo­ple who live far­ther away from the equa­tor, and typ­i­cally af­fect women more than men. As with many health is­sues, preven­tion is key. Here are just a few ways to help you iden­tify and elim­i­nate some of the causes of your blues be­fore they set in.

SEROTONIN

Have you no­ticed an uptick in carb crav­ings? If the an­swer is yes, you might be suf­fer­ing from a de­fi­ciency in serotonin. Known as “the feel- good neu­ro­trans­mit­ter,” serotonin plays a cru­cial role in reg­u­lat­ing both mood and hunger. A re­cent ar­ti­cle pub­lished in The Jour­nal of De­pres­sion Re­search and Treat­ment hy­poth­e­sizes that peo­ple who suf­fer from sea­sonal af­fec­tive dis­or­der may

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