Mar­tial Arts the Old-Fash­ioned Way

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Hav­ing al­ways held an in­ter­est in com­bat sports like box­ing and wrestling, he was in­trigued when a friend in­vited him to a school that taught a Korean fight­ing style called kang duk won.

“My �irst class, they had me sit in a low horse stance for an hour,” Greene said. “In those days, the hard­core schools would give you some­thing dif�icult to do the �irst time to see if you could take it. And if you could, then they’d let you train there.”

The reaction to that kind of test­ing dif­fers de­pend­ing on the per­son, Greene said. “Some peo­ple are not in­ter­ested. Some peo­ple just get hooked.”

That was 53 years ago, and Greene is still ac­tive in the arts. I guess you could say he was one of the ones who got hooked. AF­TER EARN­ING his kang duk won black belt un­der Bob Babich, Greene be­gan train­ing in kenpo un­der Al Tracy, the fa­ther of the mod­ern fran­chise sys­tem of mar­tial arts schools. Greene even­tu­ally re­ceived a black belt from Tracy, too, and he was of­fered a chance to open a Tracy fran­chise in Ok­la­homa.

“Grand­mas­ter Tracy re­al­ized there were a lot of young men that loved mar­tial arts but didn’t have the busi­ness acu­men to open a suc­cess­ful school,” Greene said. “Know­ing about things like lo­ca­tion and ad­ver­tis­ing is cru­cial. Grand­mas­ter Tracy said, ‘We’ll help you with that.’ He was the �irst one in mar­tial arts to re­ally do this for peo­ple.”

While op­er­at­ing his fa­cil­ity, Greene got an op­por­tu­nity to study with full-con­tact karate champ Joe Lewis, who was na­tional karate di­rec­tor for the Tracy or­ga­ni­za­tion. “I got pro­fes­sional help in run­ning my school, and I got the world

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