Take your closet from chaos to calm

Cecil Whig - - INSIDEBASEBALL -

STEP ONE: Re­move ev­ery­thing. This lets you see ex­actly how much space you have to work with. Pre­pare to be shocked by the amount of stuff that comes out of that closet.

STEP TWO: Now that you can see the light of day, give that closet a good clean­ing from top to bot­tom. Fol­low with a fresh coat of white paint.

STEP THREE: Sep­a­rate the items you re­moved. Most peo­ple hate this step, be­cause it means get­ting get rid of ev­ery­thing you do not wear or use. But there’s no way you can get all of this back into the closet, so let’s buck up and get the job done. La­bel three con­tain­ers:

— Keep: Only put items that you have worn or used at least twice in the past year into this bin. Be bru­tally harsh. If it doesn’t fit today, it’s not likely to fit any time soon. Get rid of it. If you’re in doubt, do not put the item into this bin.

— Sell or Do­nate: Clothes and other items that are not right for you (as ev­i­denced by the fact that you never wear them) but can still be use­ful for some­one else should go into this bin. What you con­sider ugly may be per­fectly ac­cept­able to some­one else. Take this bin to a con­sign­ment store or hold a yard sale. Con­sider do­nat­ing the items to The Sal­va­tion Army or Good­will. You may get a tax break, but more im­por­tantly you will feel good. You can store all of these items in the garage or in the trunk of your car.

— Throw Away: Clothes and shoes that are worn out, hope­lessly stained, bro­ken or in some other state of calamity go into this bin. Work quickly to ease the pain. Empty this bin of­ten to keep the process mov­ing.

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