FES­TI­VAL

Cecil Whig - - OPIN­ION -

mella said of the craft he’s been mak­ing and sell­ing for two years.

He said his crab de­sign is his best seller. Christ­mas trees are also pop­u­lar. His largest was a 7-foot de­sign com­mis­sioned by a restau­rant.

“I’ve had peo­ple say, ‘ Can you make me a foot­ball hel­met?’” he said of the most com­mon re­quest. “I do what I think peo­ple might like or I might like if I get stuck with it.”

Ciaramella said get­ting unique col­ors of caps such as or­anges and pur­ples are a chal­lenge. Get­ting those caps ready to mount in the de­sign is an­other.

“Bend­ing them is very time con­sum­ing,” he said, adding it can also be painful be­cause it ag­gra- vates his ten­donitis. “Some­times I have to squeeze it to make it fit in.”

The fes­ti­val also of­fered var­i­ous food trucks and mu­sic by Wal­lis and Co.

CECIL WHIG PHOTO BY JANE BELLMYER

Those who at­tended the ground­break­ing cer­e­mony for the Habi­tat for Hu­man­ity Susque­hanna house be­ing built on Maf­fitt Street in Elk­ton were in­vited to join in a prayer cir­cle to bless the project and keep ev­ery­one in­volved safe.

CECIL WHIG PHOTO BY JANE BELLMYER

While the con­crete slab had al­ready been poured, con­struc­tion of­fi­cially be­gan Fri­day morn­ing with the rais­ing of the first wall of the Habi­tat for Hu­man­ity Susque­hanna house on Maf­fitt Street in Elk­ton.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.