MI­CRO SIZE, MAXI PER­FOR­MANCE

WHEN THERE’S NO TIME TO CALL 911, YOU CAN REACH FOR YOUR SPRING­FIELD AR­MORY 911

Concealed Carry Hand Guns - - TABLE OF CONTENTS - STORY AND PHO­TOS BY RICHARD SCHUTZ

When there’s no time to call 911, you can reach for your Spring­field Ar­mory 911.

By Richard Schutz

It’s just like your fa­ther’s 1911 in .45 ACP only smaller, much smaller. That’s the Spring­field Ar­mory 911 in .380 Auto.

Spring­field Ar­mory’s new 911 pis­tol is a 1911-style, mi­cro-sub­com­pact in .380 Auto that you can have with you at all times, no mat­ter how you are dressed. When SHF, your Spring­field Ar­mory 911 will be there so you can be your own first re­spon­der.

NOT JUST AN­OTHER 1911

The Spring­field Ar­mory 911 pis­tol fits square in the mid­dle of the Taurus Spec­trum, Glock 42, S&W Body­guard and Ruger LCP II pack by both size and weight. What the oth­ers lack is the 1911 pedi­gree of the 911.

Even though there are sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­ences be­tween the 911 and a

tra­di­tional 1911, the sim­i­lar­i­ties are strik­ing. It not only looks like a 1911, but it feels like one, only smaller. The thumb safety, slide lock and mag­a­zine re­lease are all in the same rel­a­tive po­si­tions as the 1911. Any­one who can shoot a 1911 will have no trou­ble with the 911 un­less they have very large hands.

Even though the Hogue G10 trig­ger shoe piv­ots on a pin rather than trav­el­ing straight back, the trig­ger feel is crisp and breaks cleanly, just like a 1911. It breaks at an av­er­age of 6 pounds, 2 ounces for 10 con­sec­u­tive pulls as mea­sured by a dig­i­tal Ly­man Trig­ger Pull Gauge.

Some other dif­fer­ences in­clude the lack of both a grip safety and a bar­rel bush­ing. The 911 also uses a ful­l­length guide rod and spring rather than the guide rod, buf­fer, spring and plug used in most 1911s.

The thumb safety op­er­ates just like one on a 1911, but with a dif­fer­ent ef­fect. When the ham­mer is cocked, the safety can be lifted up, lock­ing the ham­mer, but not the slide. When the ham­mer is in ei­ther the half-cock or fully for­ward po­si­tion, the thumb safety locks the ham­mer in place, thereby also keep­ing the slide from op­er­at­ing.

Just like on a 1911, the mag­a­zine re­lease is lo­cated be­hind the trig­ger guard, at the bot­tom. It op­er­ates from the left side only. De­press­ing the but­ton re­leases the mag­a­zine, al­low­ing it to drop free from the mag­a­zine well.

EAS­IER DIS­AS­SEM­BLY

The slide stop lever locks the slide back when the mag­a­zine runs dry or when it is man­u­ally en­gaged. Like a 1911, it is also used to dis­as­sem­ble the 911. Dis­as­sem­bly of the 911, how­ever, is some­what dif­fer­ent from that of a 1911. Af­ter re­mov­ing the mag­a­zine and check­ing both vis­ually and tac­tilely to make sure that the pis­tol is empty, re­tract the slide to the point where the half-moon win­dow on the left side of the slide is aligned with the half-moon lug on the back (in­side) of the slide stop/take­down lever.

Then push the slide stop pin out from the right side of the frame and re­move the slide stop lever. Slowly re­lieve the ten­sion on the re­coil spring and al­low the slide to move for­ward, draw­ing it off of the frame. The re­coil rod and spring can now be re­moved from the slide by push­ing for­ward on the large end of the re­coil rod and slightly com­press­ing the re­coil spring. Care­fully lift the re­coil rod and spring as­sem­bly out of the slide while be­ing mind­ful of the com­pressed re­coil spring. Fi­nally, the bar­rel can be lifted up and back­wards, out of the slide.

The slide is re­assem­bled in re­verse or­der. When in­stalling the slide on the frame, push down on the ejec­tor to al­low the slide to move fully rear­ward. Also, when in­stalling the slide stop lever pin, make sure to cap­ture the bar­rel lug.

MOD­ELS, AC­CES­SORIES

At the time of writ­ing, there were four ver­sions of the 911. One ver­sion has a black frame and slide with green and black G10 grip pan­els. A bi-tone ver­sion has a black frame, matte stain­less-steel slide and gray and white G10 grip pan­els. The other two ver­sions are sim­i­lar to the first two only with Virid­ian green laser grip pan­els rather than the G10 pan­els.

AMMO FRIENDLY

I found the Spring­field Ar­mory 911 to be amenable to any am­mu­ni­tion that it was fed. All brands and types of am­mu­ni­tion fed, cham­bered and ejected with­out any prob­lems. The two mag­a­zines sup­plied with the 911

“ANY­ONE WHO LIKES 1911S OR NEEDS A BACKUP FOR A FULL SIZE 1911, WOULD BE FOOL­ISH NOT TO AT LEAST GIVE THE 911 A HARD LOOK AS AN EDC GUN.”

also func­tioned flaw­lessly.

For this eval­u­a­tion, I used six dif­fer­ent types of am­mu­ni­tion from six dif­fer­ent man­u­fac­tur­ers. Two of those types were full metal jacket, three were hol­low point de­fen­sive loads and one was a de­fen­sive load that uses a com­pos­ite bul­let.

NO MAL­FUNC­TIONS

I found the 911 much eas­ier to con­trol than I had an­tic­i­pated. As with any mi­cro-sub­com­pact pis­tol, ob­tain­ing the proper grip is ex­tremely im­por­tant. If the proper grip is not ex­e­cuted each time, prob­lems could arise, such as in­ad­ver­tently drop­ping the mag­a­zine, rid­ing the slide lock lever and caus­ing the slide to lock back when you don’t want it to, and en­gag­ing the safety by mis­take. The only prob­lem of those types that I en­coun­tered was that

I had a ten­dency to dis­en­gage the mag­a­zine when fir­ing from a sand­bag dur­ing ac­cu­racy eval­u­a­tions.

This mi­cro .380 Auto pis­tol was

snappy due to its small size and light weight, but it was still rel­a­tively easy to con­trol. I have small hands, so the 911 prob­a­bly fit me bet­ter than it would most men. Women should find that it fits their hands bet­ter than many pis­tols.

Dur­ing ap­prox­i­mately 350 rounds fired, I had no mal­func­tions to re­port. The mag­a­zines are easy to load and the slightly beveled mag­a­zine well al­lows mag­a­zines to be in­serted eas­ily. I have no com­plaints at all about the op­er­a­tion of the 911.

“DUR­ING AP­PROX­I­MATELY 350 ROUNDS FIRED, I HAD NO MAL­FUNC­TIONS TO RE­PORT.”

Ac­cu­racy was quite good, too, es­pe­cially for a pis­tol with a sight ra­dius of just un­der 4 inches. Ruger 56-grain ARX am­mu­ni­tion took home the ac­cu­racy hon­ors with an av­er­age of 1.98 inches for three five-shot groups at 15 yards. Fed­eral Pre­mium 99-grain HST, Hornady Crit­i­cal De­fense 90-grain FTX, Blazer 95-grain TMJ and Black Hills 90-grain JHP all came in be­tween 2.48 and 2.92 inches. PMC 90-grain FMJ had the largest av­er­age

at 3.24, but even that is ac­cept­able for a mi­cro-sub­com­pact pis­tol.

WORTH A LOOK

Over­all, I found the Spring­field Ar­mory 911 a very com­pe­tent mi­cro-sub­com­pact .380 Auto pis­tol. As well as be­ing small and light, the 911 is ac­cu­rate and func­tioned with­out in­ci­dent for over 350 rounds.

It is ex­tremely easy to con­ceal with a wide va­ri­ety of cloth­ing, whether in a boot, an­kle, AIWB, IWB, OWB or belly band hol­ster, purse, or vir­tu­ally any other way. The 911’s con­trols are easy to use and have the fa­mil­iar feel of a full size 1911. Any­one who likes 1911s or needs a backup for a full size 1911, would be fool­ish not to at least give the 911 a hard look as an EDC gun.

Some peo­ple have a prob­lem with the stop­ping power of the .380 Auto car­tridge. I un­der­stand that it doesn’t have the knock­down power of a .45 ACP, how­ever, with the proper mod­ern de­fen­sive am­mu­ni­tion, it can be an ef­fec­tive de­fen­sive round. The im­por­tant thing with an EDC pis­tol is to al­ways have it with you and to know how to shoot it well un­der ad­verse cir­cum­stances. The 911 is an EDC pis­tol that you can have with you at all times. It’s up to you to prac­tice and be­come pro­fi­cient with it. CC

The 911 rides in Spring­field Ar­mory’s pocket hol­ster that is in­cluded with the pis­tol. Daily carry gear in­cludes a spare mag­a­zine loaded with Ruger ARX 56-grain am­mu­ni­tion, a Pow­ertac E20 1180 lu­men recharge­able flash­light and aBuck Rush EDC fold­ing knife with a 2.5-inch drop point stain­less steel blade.

Right: The stripped slide as­sem­bly shows the un­der­side of the slide, bar­rel and guide rod with spring.

xx Above: Here the 911 is in the “cocked and locked” con­di­tion with the ham­mer fully cocked and the thumb safety en­gaged. Be­low: The frame, less slide, re­veals the ejec­tor lever pro­trud­ing from the frame. This must be de­pressed when re­in­stalling the slide unto the frame.

Right: The Pro-Glo sights pro­vide an ex­cel­lent sight pic­ture, es­pe­cially dur­ing low light con­di­tions. Note the Octo-Grip tex­tured main­spring hous­ing. Left: The un­der­side of the frame re­veals the lam­i­na­tions of the G10 grips, the flush-fit six-round mag­a­zine and the Octo-Grip front strap. An over­sized ex­ter­nal ex­trac­tor en­sures that spent cases are prop­erly ex­tracted and ejected. The ledge style Pro-Glo rear sight is dove­tailed into the slide.

Hogue man­u­fac­tures the piv­ot­ing G10 trig­ger shoe for the 911.

This bi-tone ver­sion of the 911 fea­tures a brushed stain­less fin­ish on the slide and a 7075 an­odized hard coat alu­minum frame. Grip pan­els are gray and white G10.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.