EDC BLADES – CRKT LCK

LIGHT AND TOUGH, THE NEW RUGER LCK IS A PER­FECT MATCH TO GO WITH YOUR LCP II PIS­TOL

Concealed Carry Hand Guns - - TABLE OF CONTENTS - STORY AND PHO­TOS BY STEVEN PAUL BAR­LOW

Usu­ally, I’m not fash­ion conscious enough to co­or­di­nate the styles of my EDC gun with my EDC knife.

I do, how­ever, de­mand some of the same traits in both a knife and a gun. They must both be of good qual­ity, sturdy and re­li­able. They have to carry com­fort­ably. They must per­form well and must be rea­son­ably priced.

Columbia River Knife & Tool (CRKT) is li­censed to pro­duce an ex­clu­sive line of Ruger knives. The knives are de­signed by some of the world’s top de­sign­ers and, like Ruger firearms, tend to be of very good qual­ity and are a good value.

With the new Ruger LCK (Light­weight Compact Knife), CRKT did much more than stick a gun com­pany logo on a knife. The knife is meant to match the ap­pear­ance of the Ruger LCP II (Light- weight Compact Pis­tol). The knife, de­signed by Sus­sex, Wis­con­sin, knife­maker Matthew Lerch, fea­tures glass­filled ny­lon grip pan­els over stain­less steel lin­ers. The tex­tur­ing on those grip pan­els matches the ser­ra­tions on the slide of the LCP II pis­tol.

OTHER FEA­TURES

The knife has a 3.3-inch drop-point blade of 8Cr13MoV steel with a satin fin­ish. The blade is nar­row—just .75 inches—so it folds into a compact, easy-to-carry pack­age roughly 1 inch wide by a hair over 4 inches long. Still, the blade is suf­fi­ciently thick at the spine at 0.124 inch. It’s not a flimsy blade.

The knife fea­tures a flip­per in­stead of thumb studs to open the blade one-handed. Once the blade is open, the flip­per serves as a fin­ger guard.

The liner lock that se­cures the blade open is sim­ple and ef­fec­tive. There is a metal pocket clip po­si­tioned for tip-up carry in a right-hand pocket. It’s not re­versible. At just 2.6 ounces, it car­ries well in the pocket.

“AF­TER MUCH USE, IN­CLUD­ING CUT­TING CARD­BOARD, WHICH ISN’T KIND TO A KNIFE BLADE, IT WAS STILL IN GOOD SHAPE.”

IN USE

I car­ried the LCK for sev­eral weeks and used it for all sorts of daily tasks that might be asked of an EDC blade. The blade was smooth to open, but a lit­tle tight at first. When us­ing the flip­per, I had to snap my wrist with a bit of ef­fort to open the blade fully. It be­came eas­ier with use. I ac­tu­ally pre­fer it the way it came. I’ve had loose-piv­ot­ing blades with flip­pers par­tially open in my pocket. Once open, the LCK showed no sign of blade wob­ble.

I used the LCK to open pack­ages, cut card­board and para­cord, whit­tle sticks, sharpen pen­cils, and even slice fruits and veg­eta­bles, though it ob­vi­ously wasn’t in­tended as a kitchen knife.

When I test a knife, I don’t in­ten­tion­ally set out to de­stroy it. Any­one can ruin a good knife. I’m more in­ter­ested in how it feels in the hand, how easy it is to con­trol it mak­ing var­i­ous cuts, and whether or not it comes from the box sharp and stays that way.

The Ruger LCK came from the factory very sharp. Af­ter much use, in­clud­ing cut­ting card­board, which isn’t kind to a knife blade, it was still in good shape. I touched up the blade with a few strokes on one of my fa­vorite ce­ramic sharp­en­ers: the rough bot­tom of my cof­fee cup to be ex­act.

The knife per­formed well with push cuts and slic­ing cuts. The spine of the blade was thick enough to be com­fort­able when I po­si­tioned my thumb over it for greater con­trol on de­tail cuts. If I was do­ing a lot of se­ri­ous cut­ting I’d pre­fer a knife with a larger han­dle. But re­mem­ber, this knife was de­signed to be small and easy to carry, just like the LCP II pis­tol.

While the blade is tech­ni­cally a drop­point in configuration, it doesn’t drop much. It’s long, slen­der pro­file makes it ex­cel­lent for de­tail work where some reach is re­quired and as well as be­ing a good pen­e­tra­tor.

AN­OTHER GUN?

I like car­ry­ing the Ruger LCK, but I’m still com­mit­ting a fash­ion faux pas when I do. You see, the knife was de­signed to match the Ruger LCP II and I own one of the orig­i­nal LCP pis­tols.

The knife stands on its own mer­its, match­ing pis­tol or not. But now I’ve got it in mind that I need the LCP II to ac­com­pany it. Or maybe I’ll talk to the folks at CRKT about mak­ing a knife to match my Ruger Amer­i­can Compact. CC

“THE TEX­TUR­ING ON THOSE GRIP PAN­ELS MATCHES THE SER­RA­TIONS ON THE SLIDE OF THE LCP II PIS­TOL.”

Right: The metal pocket clip is sturdy, but it’s not re­versible. The Ruger LCK is an in­ex­pen­sive knife of good qual­ity. It’s made by Columbia River Knife & Tool (CRKT). It’s shown with an orig­i­nal LCP pis­tol but more closely matches the LCP II.

The back of the han­dle on the LCK is open, al­low­ing lint and other de­bris to pass right out of it. With the blade open, the flip­per be­comes a fin­ger guard, adding a mea­sure of safety to the small knife.

The blade is safely se­cured in place when open by a sim­ple, but ef­fec­tive liner lock. The lock fea­tures jimp­ing on the edge for sure-handed op­er­a­tion.

Left: The LCK fits nicely in the hand and the de­sign al­lows for good con­trol de­spite the knife’s small size.

Top: The blade is tech­ni­cally a drop point, but it’s long and nar­row, giv­ing it good pen­e­trat­ing abil­ity. Mid­dle: CRKT matched the pat­tern of the slide ser­ra­tions on the Ruger LCP II pis­tol, shown here, when de­sign­ing the tex­tur­ing on the han­dle of the LCK knife.

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