Sail Away

Th­ese DIY sail­boats are not made of wood, but up­cy­cled books.

Cottages & Bungalows - - Extra - BY VICTORIA VAN VLEAR PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATIONS BY CICO BOOKS

The best part of up­cy­cling is that you can breathe new life into an ob­ject that might other­wise be des­tined for the trash. This is es­pe­cially true with books. “Some lose rel­e­vance over time and are left ne­glected on the bot­tom shelf or packed away in a box that sits long for­got­ten in the at­tic,” writes au­thor Clare Youngs. In her new book, Folded Book Art: 35 beau­ti­ful projects to trans­form your books—cre­ate cards, dis­play scenes, dec­o­ra­tions, gifts and more, she shares ways to re­vi­tal­ize old books and pages. “Books tell sto­ries be­yond the writ­ten page,” she writes. “The work of art I pro­duce from those pages is ex­tend­ing the life of the book for other gen­er­a­tions to en­joy.” If you find vin­tage chil­dren’s books at your next flea-mar­ket ex­pe­di­tion, use this tu­to­rial to turn them into minia­ture sail­boats for your home.

What You’ll Need:

Tem­plates (en­larged as de­sired for the small boat and 125% of that for the large boat) Mask­ing tape

Pen­cil

Hard book cover

Craft knife

Cut­ting mat

Strong, quick-dry­ing PVA glue

Wooden skewer

Pages from a book

Ruler

Awl (or some­thing else sharp)

What You’ll Do:

To make the smaller of the two boats, print out the tem­plates and use them to cut out the two side pieces, the back sec­tion and the top sec­tion of the boat hull. Use a craft knife, and pro­tect your work sur­face with a cut­ting mat.

Use a craft knife to shave a lit­tle off all the ad­join­ing edges, at an an­gle. This will help the sec­tions align neatly.

Take the top and one of the side sec­tions. Spread glue along the side edge of the top. Curve the side sec­tion and stick it to the top, align­ing the edges. You will need to hold the two sec­tions to­gether for a minute while the glue dries. Re­peat with the other side.

Glue the back sec­tion of the hull and at­tach it to the sides. Hold it in po­si­tion for a minute while the glue dries.

Trim the wooden skewer to mea­sure 9 ½ inches (24 cm). From a book page, cut a rec­tan­gle mea­sur­ing 8 ½ x 1 inches (22 x 2.5 cm). Spread glue over the wrong side of the paper, and wrap it tightly around the skewer, leaving ¾ inch (2 cm) of skewer un­cov­ered at the sharp end.

Use the tem­plates to cut out the sails from book pages. Glue the tabs and at­tach them to the mast, align­ing the bot­tom edges of the sails 1 ¼ inches (3 cm) up from the sharp end of the skewer.

Cut a pen­nant shape, and stick this to the top of the mast by wind­ing the first few mil­lime­ters of paper around the skewer.

Use an awl (or some­thing else sharp) to make a small hole in the top of the hull, cen­tered and 2 ¾ inches (7 cm) down from the front of the boat.

To fin­ish, place the mast into the hole.

Re­peat steps 1–9 to make the big­ger boat, with a mast mea­sur­ing 4 ¾ inches (26 cm) down from the front of the boat.

Folded Book Art: 35 beau­ti­ful projects to trans­form your books—cre­ate cards, dis­play scenes, dec­o­ra­tions, gifts and more by Clare Youngs, pub­lished by Cico Books, © 2017; ry­lan­dand­peters.com.

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