From Moroc­can tex­tiles

Cottages & Bungalows - - Ex­tra -

to Turk­ish rugs, the Bo­hemian trend is now a main­stay in home dé­cor. Ne­madji pot­tery, made by the Ne­madji Tile & Pot­tery Co. of Moose Lake, Min­nesota, is a col­lec­tor’s item that fits right in with this trend, mix­ing color and mar­bleized de­sign to cre­ate unique state­ment pieces. This pot­tery is a great way to go Bo­hemian and put some tribal ac­cents in your home.

THE CRAFT

From 1929 to 2002, the Ne­madji Tile & Pot­tery Co. pro­duced many dif­fer­ent forms of pot­tery in­tended to ap­peal to trav­el­ers and tourists in search of ex­otic Na­tive Amer­i­can arts. Ne­madji pot­tery was made to repli­cate Na­tive Amer­i­can ar­ti­facts, but over the years buy­ers be­gan to mis­take the pot­tery’s name for the name of a real Na­tive Amer­i­can tribe, and the com­pany did not dis­abuse them of the idea. While the lore of Ne­madji was built on a mis­con­cep­tion, ro­man­ti­cism is part of the ap­peal of the brand. And to­day collectors from all over the coun­try share their find­ings on blogs and fo­rums, and sell their col­lec­tions on­line.

Ne­madji pot­tery stands out for dec­o­ra­tors and collectors be­cause, al­though many of the pieces have a sim­i­lar look, the pat­terns and col­ors of their sig­na­ture mes­mer­iz­ing swirls are al­ways unique. Molded by hand with nat­u­ral clays and col­ored in a process sim­i­lar to mar­bleiz­ing pa­per, Ne­madji pot­tery gets its unique de­sign from a dip in a mix of wa­ter and paint, rather than from glaze.

THE REAL DEAL

Ne­madji pot­tery has be­come a style all its own, and many com­pa­nies or pot­ters have mar­keted their pot­tery as Ne­madji. How­ever, the orig­i­nal Ne­madji pot­tery has a stamp on the bot­tom that de­picts a

Na­tive Amer­i­can chief’s head sur­rounded by the words “Ne­madji Pot­tery USA.”The pot­tery of­ten came as vases (two-pronged wed­ding vases were a pop­u­lar shape), pitch­ers, ves­sels and even cups.

Be care­ful not to ex­pose this pot­tery to ex­ces­sive sun­light or mois­ture, which can cause cracks in the paint and the clay. If these pieces need clean­ing, sim­ply dust them gen­tly with a soft cloth or a feather duster.

PRICE

You can find Ne­madji pot­tery from $12 to $150, de­pend­ing on its size and au­then­tic­ity.

Ne­madji pot­tery stands out for dec­o­ra­tors and collectors be­cause, al­though many of the pieces

have a sim­i­lar look, the pat­terns and col­ors of their sig­na­ture mes­mer­iz­ing swirls

al­ways unique.

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