Stoneware Style

Use early Amer­i­can mo­tifs to dec­o­rate your home.

Country Sampler's Upstyled Home - - CONTENTS -

Coun­try stoneware has hard­work­ing roots in early Amer­i­can life. These pots and crocks with an out­wardly dec­o­ra­tive look were used to store all types of foods and dry goods. To­day, their art­ful ex­te­ri­ors take the lead in re­mind­ing us that the most util­i­tar­ian items can shine with their own sim­ple beauty.

SALT-GLAZED STONEWARE EM­BOD­IES THE SIM­PLIC­ITY OF COUN­TRY STYLE, FORM BEAU­TI­FULLY FOL­LOW­ING FUNC­TION.

THE FOUN­DA­TION OF COUN­TRY DEC­O­RAT­ING is built solidly upon the pres­ence of salt-glazed stoneware. The ear­li­est set­tlers used clay and sim­ple de­sign el­e­ments to cre­ate ver­sa­tile stor­age ves­sels to suc­cess­fully keep all types of sup­plies and food­stuffs. Crock­ery was cre­ated in the form of bowls, jars, pitch­ers and, of course, crocks in all shapes and sizes. Ar­ti­sans of­ten em­bel­lished the stoneware with their own per­sonal style, adding iconic na­ture mo­tifs, num­bers de­not­ing the size of the piece, and re­gional de­signs show­ing its prove­nance. To­day, col­lec­tors look for all of these el­e­ments to cre­ate showy coun­try dis­plays in cup­boards and on open shelves. Try some of these fea­tured ideas to add the graphic style and de­sign of salt-glazed pot­tery to your own home. All it takes is some paint, a brush and de­sign in­spi­ra­tion.

Stoneware de­signs can find their way into all types of home decor, such as fab­ric de­tails fused to a cur­tain bor­der.

DE­TAILS FOR DE­SIGN

Look to your vin­tage crock­ery to in­spire all types of de­sign treat­ments. A pitcher’s feather-shaped flour­ishes can be­come a bor­der on li­nen drapes. Cut de­signs out of fab­ric and fuse them to cur­tains with an iron. A vin­tage metal chair gets a num­ber- in­spired treat­ment that takes it from sim­ple chair to spec­tac­u­lar fo­cal point.

CRAFT IT

Sketch on li­nen and hand-em­broi­der your own “bird in hand.” Add a frame de­coupaged with pa­per cutouts and glazed in dark wax (left page). Pho­to­graph and print your fa­vorite salt-glazed de­sign to fit within the cutouts of a vin­tage lan­tern (place de­sign on the out­side of the lu­mi­nary). Up­cy­cle a cast-off muf­fin tin. Paint the tin with a gray wash and cut out cir­cles of printed crock de­signs to place within the open­ings. Dis­play in your kitchen or pantry area.

BE CRE­ATIVE AND MAKE IT YOUR OWN. ADOPT THESE COUN­TRY ICONS INTO YOUR DEC­O­RAT­ING MO­TIF.

An old scroll- cut window box gets a salt-glazed paint treat­ment in­spired by early stoneware. The piece was first coated in a sub­tle shade of gray and then em­bel­lished with cobalt blue. A fi­nal glaze of Salt­wash gives the en­tire piece the same feel­ing as an early crock.

Num­bers on crocks were prac­ti­cal in na­ture (de­not­ing ves­sel ca­pac­ity) but were made into in­ter­est­ing icons by ar­ti­sans looking to show off their own style.

A wa­ter­ing can gets a salt-glazed ef­fect from hand­painted sten­cil de­tails added on with a liner brush and then dis­tressed with steel wool. A glaze of Salt­wash painted over the ex­te­rior pro­vides a faded, vin­tage look.

Em­broi­der on li­nen and dis­play in a coun­try frame.

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