Friendly Ad­vice

Q: How do you keep the “thanks” in Thanks­giv­ing?

Country Woman - - LET’S CHAT -

Ev­ery year on the night be­fore Thanks­giv­ing, we make turkey piz­zas. It’s be­come one of our fa­vorite fam­ily tra­di­tions. We make our in­di­vid­ual tur­keys, and then we each talk about what we are thank­ful for.

JEN­NIFER STOWELL MONTEZUMA, IOWA

Grow­ing up, my church held a spe­cial ser­vice on Thanks­giv­ing morn­ing where we sang and thanked God for all of his bless­ings. Now with chil­dren of my own but liv­ing far from my home­town, I don’t have a Thanks­giv­ing ser­vice to at­tend. Even so, I take my chil­dren to our church, and we gather around the al­tar. We sing songs, pray and thank God for his won­der­ful bless­ings. Only then does it feel like Thanks­giv­ing to me.

RACHEL PIOCH SOLDOTNA, ALASKA

Af­ter Thanks­giv­ing din­ner our fam­ily writes Christ­mas cards for the in­jured and sick veter­ans at the Veter­ans Af­fairs St. Louis hos­pi­tal. The first year we wrote about 40 cards. Last year we had Thanks­giv­ing at a restau­rant, and our daugh­ter gave cards to any­one who would sign one or write a note. We col­lected more than 100.

LINDA JAGER CEDAR HILL, MIS­SOURI

Years ago, my chil­dren and I made “thank­ful books” for guests to sign dur­ing Thanks­giv­ing din­ner. Ev­ery year we set out these books with a pen, and our fam­ily and friends write down some­thing for which they are grate­ful. These books are now 25 years old, and the mem­o­ries recorded in them are price­less.

KALLEE KRONG-McCREERY ES­CON­DIDO, CAL­I­FOR­NIA

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.