Creative Knitting - Graceful Lace SIP 2019 : 2019-04-01

HAPPILY HOMESPUN : 110 : 110

HAPPILY HOMESPUN

Basic Stitches Garter Reading Pattern Instructio­ns Before Glossary bind- Stitch off— cast-on— beginning a pattern, look through it to make sure you are familiar with the abbreviati­ons and techniques that are used. Some patterns may be written for more than one size. In this case the smallest size is given first and others are placed in parenthese­s. When only one number is given, it applies to all sizes. You may wish to highlight the num- bers for the size you are making before beginning. It is also helpful to place a self- sticking note on the pattern to mark any changes made while working the pattern. used to finish an edge process of making founda- tion stitches used in knitting decrease—means of reducing the number of stitches in a row increase—means of adding to the number of stitches in a row intarsia—method of knitting a mul- ticolored pattern into the fabric using multiple separate yarn sources knitwise—insert needle into stitch as if to knit make method of increasing using the strand between the last stitch worked and the next stitch place place a purchased marker or loop of contrastin­g yarn onto the needle or into the fabric to facili- tate working a pattern stitch or keep track of shaping purlwise—insert needle into stitch as if to purl right piece selvage edge stitch used to make seaming easier slip an unworked stitch slipped from left needle to right needle, usually as if to purl wrong or piece work continue to work in the pattern as establishe­d without working any increases or decreases work continue to work following the pattern stitch as it has been set up or establishe­d on the needle, working any increases or decreases in such a way that the estab- lished pattern remains the same yarn method of increasing by wrapping the yarn over the right needle without working a stitch When working back and forth in rows, knit every row. When working in the round, knit one round, then purl one round. Stockinett­e Stitch When working back and forth in rows, knit right-side rows and purl wrong- side rows. When working in the round, knit all rounds. Reverse Stockinett­e Stitch When 1— working back and forth in rows, purl right-side rows and knit wrong- side rows. When working in the round, purl all rounds. Measuring To marker— measure a piece, lay it flat on a smooth surface. Take the measuremen­t in the middle of the piece. For example, measure the length to the armhole in the center of the front or back piece, not along the outer edge where the edges tend to curve or roll. Ribbing Ribbing combines knit and purl stitches within a row to give stretch to the gar- ment. Ribbing is most often used for the lower edge of the front and back, the cuffs and neck edge of garments. The rib pattern is establishe­d on the first row. On subsequent rows, the knit stitches are knitted and purl stitches are purled to form the ribs. side— public side of garment or Working From Charts A stitch— chart will often be provided as a visual representa­tion of a color or stitch pat- tern. On the chart each cell represents one stitch. A key is given indicating the color or stitch represente­d by each color or symbol in the cell. The row number is at the edge of the chart where that row begins. If the num- ber is at the right, the row is a right-side row and the chart row is read from right to left; if the number is at the left, the row is a wrong-side row and the chart row is read from left to right. When working in rounds, every row on the chart is a right-side row and is read from right to left. stitch— Gauge The side— private side of garment single most important factor in deter- mining the finished size of a knit item is the gauge. Although not as important for flat, one-piece items, it is important when mak- ing a clothing item that needs to fit properly. Before beginning, it is important to make a gauge swatch about 6 inches square using the recommende­d stitch pattern(s) and needles. If the project that you are making will be worked in the round, work your gauge swatch in the round as well. Wash and block the swatch. When the blocked swatch is dry, count the number of stitches and rows in the center 4 inches. If there are fewer stitches and/or rows than indicated in the Gauge section in the pattern, your needles are too large. Try another swatch with smaller needles. If there are more stitches and/or rows than indicated in the Gauge section in the pattern, your needles are too small. Try another swatch with larger needles. Continue to adjust needles until correct gauge is achieved. even— in pattern as establishe­d— over— Use of Zero In patterns that include various sizes, zeros are sometimes necessary. For example, k0 (0, 1) means if you are mak- ing the smallest or middle size, you would do nothing, and if you are mak- ing the largest size, you would k1. Knitting Needles Conversion Chart U. S. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 101/2 11 13 15 Metric (mm) 2 21/4 23/4 31/4 31/2 33/4 4 41/2 5 51/2 6 61/2 8 9 10 110 Graceful Lace APRIL 2019 FIND US @ www. facebook. com/ CreativeKn­ittingMaga­zine

© PressReader. All rights reserved.