KIN­LOUGH ARAN AFGHAN

Crochet! - - Contents - De­sign by Melissa Leap­man

CHAL­LENG­ING

FIN­ISHED MEA­SURE­MENTS

52 inches wide x 62 inches long

MA­TE­RI­ALS

• Brown Sheep Lamb’s Pride Su­per­wash Worsted medium ( worsted) weight su­per­wash wool yarn ( 31/2 oz/ 200 yds/ 100g per skein):

19 skeins # SW18 lichen • Sizes I/ 9/ 5.5mm cro­chet hook or size needed

to ob­tain gauge • Ta­pes­try nee­dle

GAUGE

12 sts = 4 inches; 5 rows = 4 inches

PAT­TERN NOTES

Chain-2 at be­gin­ning of row counts as first half dou­ble cro­chet un­less oth­er­wise stated. Skip each half dou­ble cro­chet be­hind front post stitches. Join with slip stitch as in­di­cated un­less oth­er­wise stated.

SPE­CIAL STITCH

Pop­corn (pc): Work 5 dc in in­di­cated st, drop lp from hook, rein­sert hook in first dc of 5- dc group, pick up dropped lp and pull through first dc, push pop­corn to RS of fab­ric.

AFGHAN

Foun­da­tion row 1 (RS): Ch 148, hdc in 3rd ch from hook and in each ch across, turn. (147 hdc)

Foun­da­tion row 2: Ch 2 (see Pat­tern Notes), hdc in each st across, end­ing with hdc in top of beg ch-2, turn.

Row 1 (RS): Ch 2, hdc in each of next 5 sts;

A. * fptr (see Stitch Guide) in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made (see Pat­tern Notes), hdc in each of next 3 sts, fptr in next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made;

B. hdc in each of next 2 sts, sk next 3 sts, fpdtr (see Stitch Guide) in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter 2 hdc just made, hdc in next st, work­ing in front of last 3 sts just made, fpdtr in each of first 2 sk sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in each of next 2 sts;

C. fptr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in each of next 3 sts, fptr in each next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made**, hdc in each of next 4 sts; D. [sk next 3 sts, fpdtr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter hdc sts just made, hdc in next st, work­ing in front of last 3 sts just made, fpdtr in each of 2 sk sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in each of next 5 sts] twice;

E. sk next 3 sts, fpdtr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter hdc sts just made, hdc in next st, work­ing in front of last 3 sts just made, fpdtr in each of 2 sk sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in each of next 4 sts;

F. rep from * across, end­ing fi­nal rep at **, hdc in each of next 6 sts, turn. (24 fptr, 9 sets of crossed fpdtr, 78 hdc)

Row 2: Ch 2, hdc in each st across, end­ing with hdc in top of beg ch-2, turn.

Master cro­cheted ca­bles in this time­less and

exquisitely crafted afghan pat­tern.

Row 3: Ch 2, hdc in each of next 5 sts;

A. * fptr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in next st, pc (see Spe­cial Stitch) in next st, hdc in next st, fptr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made;

B. hdc in each of next 2 sts, fptr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in next st, fptr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in each of next 2 sts;

C. fptr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in next st, pc in next st, hdc in next st, fptr in next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made**, hdc in each of next 2 sts;

D. [fpdtr in each of next 2 fpdtr 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter 2 hdc just made on work­ing row, hdc in each of next 5 sts, fpdtr in 2 sk fpdtr 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts af­ter hdc just made, hdc in next st] twice;

E. fpdtr in each of next 2 fpdtr 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter 2 hdc just made on work­ing row, hdc in next 5 sts, fpdtr in 2 sk fpdtr 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts af­ter hdc just made, hdc in each of next 2 sts;

F. rep from * across, end­ing fi­nal rep at **, hdc in each of next 6 sts, turn.

Row 4: Rep row 2.

Row 5: Ch 2, hdc in each of next 5 sts;

A. * fptr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in each of next 3 sts, fptr in next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made;

B. hdc in each of next 2 sts, sk next 3 sts on work­ing row, sk 2 fpdtr 2 rows be­low, fpdtr in next 2 fpdtr 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter 2 hdc just made, hdc in next st, work­ing in front of last 3 sts made, fpdtr in each of first 2 sk fpdtr 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter hdc just made, hdc in each of next 2 sts; C. fptr in next 2 fptr 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in each of next 3 sts, fptr in next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made;

D. hdc in each of next 2 sts, fpdtr in each of next 2 fpdtr 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made**, [hdc in each of next 2 sts, pc in next st, hdc in each of next 2 sts, sk next 3 sts on work­ing row, sk 2 fpdtr 2 rows be­low, fpdtr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter 2 hdc just made on work­ing row, hdc in next st, work­ing be­hind last 3 sts made, fpdtr in 2 sk sts 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter last hdc made] twice;

E. hdc in each of next 2 sts, pc in next st, hdc in each of next 2 sts, fpdtr in each of next 2 fpdtr 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in each of next 2 sts;

F. rep from * across, end­ing fi­nal rep at **, hdc in each of next 6 sts, turn.

Row 6: Rep row 2.

Row 7: Ch 2, hdc in each of next 5 sts;

A. * fptr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in next st, pc in next st, hdc in next st, fptr in next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made;

B. hdc in each of next 2 sts, fptr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in next st, fptr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made, hdc in each of next 2 sts, fptr in each of next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made;

C. hdc in next st, pc in next st, hdc in next st, fptr in next 2 sts 2 rows be­low, sk 2 sts be­hind 2 sts just made**, hdc in each of next 4 sts;

D. [fpdtr in each of 2 sk fpdtr 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter hdc just made on work­ing row, hdc in next st, fpdtr in each of next 2 fpdtr 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter hdc just made on work­ing row, hdc in each of next 5 sts] twice; E. fpdtr in each of 2 sk fpdtr 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter hdc just made on work­ing row, hdc in next st, fpdtr in each of next 2 fpdtr 2 rows be­low, sk next 2 sts af­ter hdc just made on work­ing row, hdc in each of next 4 sts;

F. rep from * across, end­ing fi­nal rep at **, hdc in each of next 6 sts, turn.

Row 8: Rep row 2. Rep rows 1– 8 un­til piece mea­sures ap­prox­i­mately 62 inches from beg, end­ing with a row 2. Fas­ten off.

Edg­ing

With RS fac­ing, join (see Pat­tern Notes) in any cor­ner and ch 1. Work 2 rnds of sc evenly sp around Afghan work­ing 3 sc in each cor­ner, join in first sc at end of each rnd.

Next rnd: Work 1 rnd of re­verse sc (see Stitch Guide) around, join in first re­verse sc. Fas­ten off.

Tas­sel

Make 4. Cut 55 strands of yarn each 16 inches long. Hold­ing 53 strands tog, tie sep­a­rate strand around cen­ter of bun­dle (see il­lus­tra­tion A). Fold strands in half at cen­ter tie. Leav­ing cen­ter tie strand loose, wrap sep­a­rate strand sev­eral times around bun­dle 1 inch from fold, tie ends se­curely (see il­lus­tra­tion B). Trim strand to same length as Tas­sel. Us­ing cen­ter tie strand at top, tie one Tas­sel in each cor­ner of Afghan.

C!

or less, while a Su­per 150 has a mi­cron count of 15 or less. Sta­tis­ti­cally speak­ing, Su­per 150s is finer than cash­mere.

Worsted— In this con­text, this term is not re­fer­ring to the yarn’s weight, but to the process it un­der­goes. It is wool which has gone through a sec­ond comb­ing process to en­sure that all the fibers lay par­al­lel to each other and are of the same length be­fore be­ing spun into a com­pact, smooth, twisted yarn.

Woolen— This refers to a yarn that has been spun from fibers that are carded or pre­pared in a ran­dom ar­range­ment and spun to be light and airy in com­par­i­son to a worsted yarn.

Vir­gin— This term can be used to de­scribe two dif­fer­ent qual­i­ties. The first is the same as lamb­swool (the first shear­ing), and the sec­ond in­di­cates that this wool has not been used for any other yarn or process be­fore this. Wool is a fiber that can easily be re­cy­cled, and “vir­gin” means that the prod­uct is the first use for this wool.

Fibers like al­paca, llama, gua­naco, vi­cuna, camel, bi­son, musk ox, yak, an­gora (rab­bit), mo­hair (An­gora goat) and cash­mere are some of the more com­mon lux­ury fibers read­ily found in to­day’s yarns, and in­stead of be­ing wool, these are ac­tu­ally clas­si­fied as hair. These fibers are also pro­tein- based like wool, but they have hol­low cores. These hairs are also iden­ti­fied as hav­ing a low mi­cron num­ber, mean­ing that they are very fine. They trap heat well (some may even be warmer then wool), are also fire re­sis­tant, and have many of the same qual­i­ties of wool.

Yet there are some dif­fer­ences. These fibers do not ac­cept dyes as well as wools do, so col­ors will not nec­es­sar­ily be as deep (this can be com­pen­sated for in var­i­ous dye­ing pro­cesses, but those pro­cesses are more ex­pen­sive). They have no lano­lin, so they are more hy­poal­ler­genic than wool. They also have fewer scales, so they do not felt easily, if at all.

Most of these lux­ury fibers are com­prised of two dif­fer­ent types of hairs— the soft downy un­der­coat used in lux­ury yarns and coarse guard hairs. These guard hairs need to be re­moved be­fore the rest are spun into yarn be­cause they can break in the process, caus­ing a very scratchy fin­ished prod­uct. The fiber can ac­tu­ally be gath­ered just by brush­ing the an­i­mal; how­ever, in the United States many al­pacas are shorn (for the gath­er­ing of fleeces, as well as to en­sure that the an­i­mal does not get too hot in this warmer cli­mate). Some of these an­i­mal va­ri­eties in other parts of the world have not been fully do­mes­ti­cated, and they live nearly wild ex­is­tences. Their fibers are har­vested by wait­ing for the an­i­mal to shed and then gath­er­ing the dis­lodged fibers from the sur­round­ing en­vi­ron­ment.

The most pop­u­lar fibers from goats— cash­mere and mo­hair—are al­most op­po­site yarns. Mo­hair fibers, which come from An­gora goats, have great luster due to the fact that the hair lacks scales and is able to re­flect light from its smooth sur­face. It is also a very strong fiber and is of­ten used in the con­struc­tion of knot­ted pile car­pets in ad­di­tion to be­ing a fash­ion fiber.

Cash­mere, on the other hand, is not from a par­tic­u­lar breed of goat, but a fiber that must meet cer­tain stan­dards and qual­i­fi­ca­tions. To be con­sid­ered cash­mere, a fiber must be from the un­der­coat of a goat and have a mi­cron count of 19 or finer, with less than 3 per­cent by weight of fibers ex­ceed­ing 30 mi­crons. It must be at least 11/4 inches (3cm) in length and have a spe­cific crimp struc­ture. Cash­mere is springy and able to hold its shape well. It has a beau­ti­ful drape and is in­cred­i­bly warm and light­weight. This fiber is not lus­trous, but vel­vety and light-ab­sorb­ing.

One of the most com­mon fears when work­ing with wool or a wool blend is its ten­dency to felt. Felt­ing oc­curs when the scales of the fiber in­ter­lock with the scales of an ad­ja­cent fiber. This oc­curs more easily in sit­u­a­tions with high amounts of ag­i­ta­tion where the fibers rub to­gether; how­ever, heat and soap can speed up the process. Once the fiber is felted, it re­mains felted; there is no way to undo the process. So use some cau­tion. Do not use wool yarns for items where the fab­ric will rub against it­self fre­quently.

Con­sider hand wash­ing and then lay­ing it flat to dry. The rec­om­mended

care of a yarn will be listed on the yarn la­bel, but a good rule of thumb is that less is more when it comes to clean­ing wool.

These fibers cre­ate beau­ti­ful yarns that of­fer dif­fer­ent struc­tures and

Use long end to seam first and last rows tog.

Col­lar Edg­ing

With RS fac­ing, join in bot­tom cor­ner of Neck Shap­ing on Front.

Row 1: Ch 13, sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in each ch across, sl st twice to neck, turn. (12 sc)

Row 2: Sc in back lp in each sc across, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, sc in back lp in each sc across, sl st twice along edge of body, turn. Rep last 2 rows evenly around neck open­ing. Fas­ten off. Whip­stitch (see il­lus­tra­tion) first and last rows to bot­tom of neck edge.

Sew tog­gle but­ton to 1 side.

Tog­gle Ring On side op­po­site to tog­gle, join in 3rd row from bot­tom neck seam, ch 6, join in next row. Fas­ten off.

Sleeve Edg­ing Work as for Bot­tom Edg­ing on 7 chs. Seam last and first row tog with yarn nee­dle and tail. Weave in all ends.

C!

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