LEARN TO DO WAFFLE WEAVE

Crochet! - - Contents - By Nancy Nehring

Waffle weave cro­chet is a stitch that forms a thick, stretchy, in­ter­lock­ing dou­ble layer of fab­ric.

The in­ter­lock­ing of two lay­ers pro­duces a dim­pled sur­face that looks like a waffle iron im­print. The dim­ples trap air into lit­tle pock­ets which cre­ates a fab­ric that is very warm. It is the air pock­ets, not the tight­ness, thick­ness or weight of the yarn/cro­chet, that con­trib­ute to the warmth.

The right side of the fab­ric shows on both front and back. This makes pieces re­versible.

Gauge

Ob­tain­ing an ac­cu­rate gauge is dif­fi­cult in this stitch be­cause the stitch is so stretchy and the in­ter­lock­ing causes the fab­ric to shrink over the first few rows. Make a large swatch and mea­sure the gauge near the top. If you are part­way through a project and find your gauge is off slightly, even though you made a swatch and are work­ing to the swatch spec­i­fi­ca­tions, you will prob­a­bly be OK be­cause the fab­ric is so stretchy.

Pat­tern Notes

You work through the front loops when mak­ing the waffle weave stitch. Front and back loops are named from the side of the cro­chet fac­ing you— when you turn your work, what was a front loop be­comes a back loop and vice versa!

The front of the fab­ric is the side fac­ing you at the mo­ment. The back of the fab­ric is the side away from you at the mo­ment. These change when you turn your work!

The right side of the fab­ric is the side that is the good side or out­side when a project is com­pleted. The wrong side of the fab­ric is the bad side, back side or in­side.

The Stitch

The waffle weave stitch is worked back and forth (i.e. with turns) even when work­ing in the round as for a hat. Use a knife (palm) grip to re­duce hand fa­tigue. Switch to the knife grip even if you use a pen­cil grip for your other cro­chet.

You will be us­ing hooks that may seem too large for the yarn weight. How­ever, smaller hooks cause the fab­ric to be stiff and re­duce the size of the air pock­ets so the fab­ric is not as warm.

To learn the waffle weave stitch, make a beg ch of 14 chs. Row 1: Sk first ch, sc in front lp (see Photo A) of each rem ch, turn. Row 2: Ch 1, * insert hook from bot­tom to top un­der front lp of beg ch (this was the back bump of beg ch that was not used in row 1; it be­came the front lp when you turned your work— Photo B), insert hook from bot­tom to top un­der front lp of sc of row 1 di­rectly above ch, yo, draw through 2 front lps, yo and draw through 2 lps on hook; rep from * across, turn. In the project in­struc­tions, this is writ­ten (sc tog front lp of beg ch and row 1) across, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, * insert hook from bot­tom to top un­der front lp of sc in row 1 (2 rows pre­vi­ous, the front lps form a hor­i­zon­tal line across the bot­tom of the piece— Photo C), insert hook from bot­tom to top un­der front lp of sc in row 2 ( pre­vi­ous row), ( yo, draw through 2 front lps, yo and draw through 2 lps on hook; rep from * across, turn. In project in­struc­tions, this is writ­ten (sc tog front lp from 2 rows pre­vi­ous and front lp from pre­vi­ous row) across, turn.

Row 4: Ch 1; * insert hook from bot­tom to top un­der front lp of sc 2 rows pre­vi­ous (front lps form a hor­i­zon­tal row— Photo D), insert hook from bot­tom to top un­der front lp of sc in pre­vi­ous row, yo, draw through 2 front lps, yo and draw through 2 lps on hook; rep from * across, turn. Rep row 4 for de­sired length. In project in­struc­tions, this is writ­ten (sc tog front lp from 2 rows pre­vi­ous and front lp from pre­vi­ous row) or work in waffle weave pat­tern.

Last Row (Bind Off): Ch 1, (sc to front lp from 2 rows pre­vi­ous and both front and back lps from pre­vi­ous row) across. Fas­ten off.

Photo A

Photo B

Photo C

Photo D

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