CROSSWORD PUZ­ZLE

Daily Freeman (Kingston, NY) - - LIFE - Edited by Rich Nor­ris and Joyce Ni­chols Lewis

“BIG TIME” By MATT SKOCZEN

27 28

29 30 32 33 35

36

41 42 44 45 46

47 49 64 65

66

68 69

71

74 76 77

78

81 83 84

88

90 92 94

95

ACROSS

Suf­fered a set­back 9 Shared spirit 14 Bit by bit 20 Swimwear

op­tion 21 “High wav­ing heather __ stormy blasts bend­ing”: Emily Brontë 22 Tie up 23 Break­fast or­der 25 Writ word 26 NFL line­man­turned-ac­tor Alex Pow­der first mar­keted as Hud­son’s Soap Burned in a thuri­ble Span­ish liqueur Rolled __ Garage event Di­rected Abbr. for old dates Fruity pas­try shop pur­chase Twist­edly funny “Ab­so­lutely!” __ bread Still-life subject Tabasco, por ejem­plo Il­lu­sions in an act Fop­pish neck­wear 51 Unite 55 Yokels 58 Drag, e.g. 61 Delete 62 What X may

mean 63 Pity-evok­ing qual­ity Bird: Pref. Ber­nadette et al.: Abbr. Tam­many Hall Tiger artist U.K. coun­try Kugel in­gre­di­ent Mid­dle of Christ­mas? Spa fea­ture Part of Q.E.D. First name in dance Wed­ding ac­qui­si­tion, per­haps? Work for Court tie Try­panosome trans­mit­ter M, on many forms En­ergy out­put Con­cepts 2001 box­ing biopic Stab 1 Richie’s dad, to the Fonz 99 F1 neigh­bor on

PCs 100 U. of Mary­land player “No prob­lem” San­dra Den­ton, in a hip-hop trio “No prob­lem” Rap­per __ Shakur Kitchen gad­get Louisiana cui­sine 1949 Crosby film set in Ire­land 114 Set 115 Stirred 116 Scolds se­verely News­pa­per ad, com­monly Bal­ti­more’s __ Har­bor Least sea­soned 98 101 102

103 105

108 110

111 117 118 119

1 2 3

DOWN

“__ baby ... ” Adds value to Most skep­ti­cal 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 24

28 Mimes Ital­ian coastal city Un­der­stands Friendly front? JFK, e.g. Sign up Many a se­nior They may be tipped “The Simp­sons” bus driver By­ron’s “__ Walks in Beauty” Mount named for a friend of Ge­orge Van­cou­ver Not quite a ringer Wa­ger­ing places: Abbr. Fan of Pat and Vanna, fa­mil­iarly Band heads Jr. and sr. “Sym­phony in Black” artist Stur­geon del­i­cacy 30 31 32 34 36 37

38 39 40 43

45 47 48

50 52 Re­veal in a poem? Tap­room quencher Let­ters in the sand? Easter dec­o­rat­ing sup­ply Opera that pre­miered in Cairo in 1871 Char­ac­ter­ized by Im­pulse Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in­ductee the same year as Clap­ton and Tay­lor Wall re­cess Word from Tonto Big name in sport­ing goods Rap sheet rou­tines: Abbr. Turn gray, maybe Rap (with) Rap’s Dr. __ 53 54 56

57 58 59

60 63

65 67

70

72 73

74

75 76 78 79

80 82 85 Shock source Te­dium Hawai­ian cof­fee dis­trict U.S. Army E-6 Spell­bound Swear to be true Ones not at home on the range Hym­nal that’s of­ten richly il­lus­trated Rating unit Mas­sachusetts cape On the safer side “Ditto!” Back on the ocean Cham­pagne word “Odds __ ... ” Still-life subject Sooner than Slug­like “Star Wars” alien “Dil­bert” in­tern Heated Face­book fea­ture Me­dusa’s hair, af­ter Athena got done with it Dish re­quir­ing spe­cial uten­sils Ques­tel who voiced Betty Boop Loser Data-up­load­ing let­ters 6-pt. scores Loft filler Salon ap­pli­ance Win­ter warmer Apiece Se­cure, on a farm Por­tend College __ Con­ver­sant with 107 Nose (around) 108 Vi­tal­ian, for one 109 Gaelic tongue 110 See 111-Down 111 With 110Down, East­ern dis­ci­pline Bit of work Fallen space sta­tion 86 87 88

89 91

92 93 95

96 97 102

104 105 106 112 113

Do you know of any eti­quette guide­lines for speak­ing with some­one who has a stut­ter or another speech im­ped­i­ment? I re­cently be­friended a man from the neigh­bor­hood who has a stut­ter. I have a bad habit of fin­ish­ing other peo­ple’s sen­tences in gen­eral, and I find my­self want­ing to jump in and help him com­plete his thought when he pauses. I’m as­sum­ing that is con­sid­ered rude. Dear An­nie — Won­der­ing

The eti­quette for talk­ing to some­one who stut­ters is the same as the eti­quette for talk­ing to some­one who doesn’t. Lis­ten; be pa­tient; make eye con­tact; and ask for clar­i­fi­ca­tion if you missed some­thing. Don’t in­ter­rupt, fin­ish his sen­tences or rush him to get to the point. The only dif­fer­ence is that it’s more im­por­tant to ob­serve that deco­rum when talk­ing to some­one who stut­ters, lest you come off as pa­tron­iz­ing.

I be­lieve that your friend came into your life for a rea­son — to teach you pa­tience and the lost art of hold­ing one’s tongue. Be a good lis­tener to him and you’ll be­come a bet­ter com­mu­ni­ca­tor with any­one.

I have been friends with a group of women since our high-school days. Since then, some of us have moved out of town, but once a year, we all get to­gether. My prob­lem is that my friends are all heavy drinkers. Be­cause I am the only one who doesn’t en­joy drink­ing, I have al­ways been the des­ig­nated driver. I didn’t like that role in my teens and 20s, but I re­ally re­sent it now that we’re in our 60s.

Af­ter din­ner, my friends insist on go­ing to pubs to con­tinue their “par­ty­ing” un­til the wee hours. As the al­co­hol flows, my friends be­come drunk and repet­i­tive and are, frankly, ter­ri­ble com­pany. This year, I would like to break with tra­di­tion and head home af­ter din­ner, but I don’t know how to do it with­out their be­ing fu­ri­ous with me. If I were to leave them af­ter din­ner and they were to stay out drink­ing, they would be an­gry at hav­ing to take costly taxis they can’t af­ford. On the other hand, if they were to leave with me af­ter din­ner, they would be livid at my cut­ting their evening short and be­ing “the party pooper.”

Be­cause of their peer pres­sure, I now dread our an­nual get-to­geth­ers. Any ad­vice? — Des­ig­nated

If these women grow fu­ri­ous with you for want­ing to go home af­ter din­ner, they’re not friends; they’re bul­lies. It sounds as if you’re an oblig­ing, sweet per­son, and this sweet­ness has spoiled these women over the years, to the point that they feel en­ti­tled to your char­ity. You shouldn’t be pun­ished for not be­ing a lush. And if they can’t af­ford to take taxis, then they shouldn’t be spend­ing money on drinks in the first place.

In ad­vance of your next get-to­gether, let them know you won’t be the des­ig­nated driver this year, that you plan on call­ing it an early night and they should ar­range for a cab or use another ride-hail­ing ser­vice. Let them throw their hissy fits; they’ll get over it. If they want to keep you as a friend, then they should treat you less like a chauf­feur.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.