En­joy a cooler jolt of joe in the morn­ing

En­joy a dif­fer­ent morn­ing jolt

Daily Local News (West Chester, PA) - - FRONT PAGE - By Emily Ryan For Dig­i­tal First Me­dia

What do cold brew cof­fee and kale have in com­mon? “Like kale, it’s trend­ing up,” said Zach Mor­ris of Green En­gine Cof­fee Co. in Haver­ford. “All the big play­ers in cof­fee, they’re all do­ing some cold brew bev­er­age.” Un­like a tra­di­tional cup of Joe or an iced cof­fee, which ac­tu­ally starts out hot, cold brew is just that – coarsely ground cof­fee steeped in cold wa­ter for 12 to 24 hours.

DIY COLD BREW

Cu­ri­ous about cold brew? Make your own at home. “You can sort of set it and for­get it,” said Zach Mor­ris of Green En­gine Cof­fee Co. in Haver­ford. “It’s so sim­ple.” “The eas­i­est way to make cold brew cof­fee at home is to buy a French press,” he ex­plained. “It al­ways helps to have your own grinder and grind your own beans.” You want them coarsely ground, “the coarser the bet­ter in this case.” Sim­ply add the right amount of cold wa­ter, re­frig­er­ate and “wait to press it.” “The colder, the darker, the less dis­turbed it is - the longer it keeps,” Mor­ris said.

“There’s a dif­fer­ent chem­istry go­ing on,” he ex­plained. “You’re yield­ing a softer, gen­tler bev­er­age. It’s not as in­tense.”

And like kale, “it keeps a long time,” added Mor­ris, a som­me­lier and former di­rec­tor of ed­u­ca­tion at the Wine School of Philadel­phia. “There are a lot of par­al­lels be­tween cold brew and brew­ing beer, hon­estly, or mak­ing wine.”

He even uses beer-brew­ing equip­ment for his cold brew at the cof­fee shop.

“It’s truly a craft busi­ness too. It’s like craft beer,” agreed Matt Adams of Back­yard Beans Cof­fee Com­pany in Lansdale, who pro­duces cold brew at a lo­cal win­ery and sells it in nitro cans.

“Our cold brew pours like a Guin­ness out of the can,” he de­scribed. “It has a nice cas­cade when you pour it. It re­sults in a froth­ier, creamier cof­fee that even has a head on it like a ni­tro­gen beer does.”

Adams be­gins by roast­ing his own beans.

“We are at the heart of our busi­ness cof­fee roast­ers,” he said. “I started roast­ing on our grill in the back­yard. That’s where the name Back­yard

Beans comes from.”

Adam Jones of Pelo­ton Cold Brew Cof­fee in West Chester found in­spi­ra­tion dur­ing a bike ride, hence the name Pelo­ton the main pack of cy­clists in a race.

After drink­ing cold brew for the first time, “I thought, ‘I could make it bet­ter than this,’” he re­called, so Jones started ex­per­i­ment­ing and launched a fam­ily busi­ness.

“We use an Ethiopian-ori­gin (bean). It gives it this de­li­cious choco­latey note and this amaz­ing sweet­ness,” he said. “It’s very easy on the palate and very smooth to drink with­out any cream or su­gar.”

Try a bot­tle of orig­i­nal or mighty maple.

“Not all cold brews are cre­ated equal,” stressed his brother, Dave Jones. “We’re su­per pas­sion­ate about what we do. We’re just try­ing to cre­ate the best cold brew.”

Cold Brew Cof­fee

For a 1 liter/36-ounce French press, add 75 grams/2 ounces of fresh, coarse-ground cof­fee and fill the re­main­ing vol­ume with cold wa­ter. Stir. Store in the re­frig­er­a­tor for about 12 hours and then press the cof­fee. To make a stronger ex­tract, just in­crease the cof­fee-to-wa­ter ra­tio and then di­lute after brew­ing to the de­sired strength/in­ten­sity. Cold brew cof­fee keeps very fresh for about 5 days if stored cold and undis­turbed.

NOLA-Style Cold Brew

Same recipe but add about 10 grams of chicory (can be bought in Ama­zon) and then sweeten the fin­ished brew with milk and a dash of sweet­ener such as maple syrup or sim­ple syrup.

Cold Brew Mock­tails

We like to add any type of sweet­ener to cold brew. Get cre­ative - mud­dled berries, Fen­ti­mans Cu­rios­ity Cola, Luxardo maraschino cher­ries. Or if you wanna make it for adults, oak-aged spir­its marry well with cof­fee (bour­bon, Scotch, cognac, etcetera).

PHOTO COUR­TESY OF BACK­YARD BEANS COF­FEE COM­PANY

Matt Adams roasts his own cof­fee beans.

PHOTO BY EMILY RYAN

You’ll need coarsely ground beans, cold wa­ter and a French press to make cold brew cof­fee at home.

PHOTO COUR­TESY OF ADAM JONES

En­joy Pelo­ton Cold Brew Cof­fee in orig­i­nal or mighty maple.

PHOTO COUR­TESY OF ADAM JONES

Brothers Adam and Dave Jones cre­ate Pelo­ton Cold Brew Cof­fee.

PHOTO COUR­TESY OF BACK­YARD BEANS COF­FEE COM­PANY

Find Back­yard Beans’ cold brew cof­fee on tap at farm­ers’ mar­kets.

PHOTO BY EMILY RYAN

Try mak­ing cold brew cof­fee at home with a French press.

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