Ro­botic surgery can be ad­van­ta­geous

Daily Local News (West Chester, PA) - - RETIREMENT LIFESTYLES -

Cer­tain ill­nesses or in­juries re­quire surgery to cor­rect the prob­lem or pre­vent fur­ther dam­age. Surgery is not some­thing many peo­ple would vol­un­teer for, but it can be a ne­ces­sity in cer­tain in­stances.

Pa­tients may have many ques­tions when they learn that surgery is on the hori­zon. Ro­botic surgery in par­tic­u­lar may raise pa­tients’ eye­brows. Ro­botic surgery is a rel­a­tively re­cent de­vel­op­ment. Ac­cord­ing to UC Health and Mount Carmel Med­i­cal Cen­ter, ro­botic surgery is an ad­vanced form of min­i­mally invasive or la­paro­scopic (small in­ci­sion) surgery. Com­pared to open surg­eries, ro­botic surgery of­fers many ben­e­fits to pa­tients, some of which in­clude: ● min­i­mal scar­ring ● re­duced blood loss ● faster re­cov­ery time ● re­duced risk of in­fec­tion ● re­duced pain and dis­com­fort ● pos­si­bly shorter hos­pi­tal­iza­tion

● faster re­cov­ery time Ro­botic surgery works sim­i­larly to tra­di­tional surgery, but in­stead of the sur­geon work­ing man­u­ally, ro­botic arms take over. Dur­ing ro­botic surgery, typ­i­cally three ro­botic arms are in­serted into the pa­tient through small in­ci­sions. One arm is a cam­era and the other two serve as the sur­geon’s “hands.” In some in­stances, a fourth arm is used to clear away any ob­struc­tions. Sur­geons will per­form the pro­ce­dure us­ing a com­puter-con­trolled con­sole.

Ro­botic surgery does not mean that a ro­bot is tak­ing the place of a sur­geon. Rather, ro­botic surgery com­bines the skills and knowl­edge of sur­geons with ad­vance­ments in tech­nol­ogy in an ef­fort to im­prove sur­gi­cal pro­ce­dures. Many sur­geons pre­fer ro­botic surgery be­cause of its pre­ci­sion and the su­pe­rior vi­su­al­iza­tion of the sur­gi­cal field that the pro­ce­dure pro­vides. It’s also eas­ier to ac­count for tremors in the hands, and the ma­chin­ery en­ables greater ma­neu­ver­abil­ity.

UC Health ex­plains how ro­botic surgery works:

The sur­geon will work from a com­puter con­sole in the op­er­at­ing room, con­trol­ling the minia­tur­ized in­stru­ments mounted on the ro­botic arms. He or she looks through a 3-D cam­era at­tached to an­other ro­botic arm, which mag­ni­fies the sur­gi­cal site. The sur­geon’s hand, wrist and fin­ger move­ments will be trans­mit­ted through the com­puter con­sole to the in­stru­ments at­tached to the ro­bot’s arms. The mim­icked move­ments have the same range of mo­tion as the sur­geon, al­low­ing for max­i­mum con­trol. While the sur­geon is work­ing, the surgi-

cal team will su­per­vise the ro­bot at the pa­tient’s bed­side.

Men, women and chil­dren can ben­e­fit from ro­botic surgery, which has be­come es­pe­cially help­ful for gy­ne­co­logic con­di­tions. Ro­botic surgery has been used in the treat­ment of can­cers of the ab­domen, as well as pelvic masses, fi­broids, tu­mors, and tubal lig­a­tions. Ro­botic surgery also can be used for pelvic re­con­struc­tion surg­eries and to treat in­con­ti­nence and or­gan pro­lapse.

Although the suc­cess rates of tra­di­tional surgery ver­sus ro­botic surgery have been rel­a­tively sim­i­lar, many peo­ple are now lean­ing to­ward ro­botic surgery be­cause of its advantages — and seek­ing doc­tors and hos­pi­tals trained in ro­botic surgery.

Ro­botic surgery does not mean that a ro­bot is tak­ing the place of a sur­geon. Rather, ro­botic surgery com­bines the skills and knowl­edge of sur­geons with ad­vance­ments in tech­nol­ogy in an ef­fort to im­prove sur­gi­cal pro­ce­dures.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.