Ben Stiller cred­its prostate can­cer test for sav­ing his life

Daily Local News (West Chester, PA) - - FEATURES -

NEW YORK » Ben Stiller on Tues­day re­vealed that he bat­tled prostate can­cer in 2014, and he cred­its the test that di­ag­nosed the can­cer with sav­ing his life.

In an es­say posted on the web­site Medium , Stiller re­counted his ex­pe­ri­ence with prostate can­cer in de­tail. He com­pared the mo­ment of be­ing in­formed by his urol­o­gist that he had can­cer to his own “Break­ing Bad” scene.

“His voice lit­er­ally faded out like ev­ery movie or TV show about a guy be­ing told he had can­cer ... a clas­sic Wal­ter White mo­ment, ex­cept I was me and no one was film­ing any­thing at all,” wrote Stiller.

Stiller is now can­cer-free and he be­lieves that would never have hap­pened with­out a PSA or prostate-spe­cific anti­gen test. Stiller said he wanted to tell his story in sup­port of the much-de­bated test.

Stiller had his PSA test when he was 46, four years be­fore the Amer­i­can Can­cer So­ci­ety rec­om­mends. Many ex­perts say a PSA can do as much harm as good. PSA tests are im­pre­cise, and they can lead to un­nec­es­sary treat­ment of non­lethal can­cers.

But PSA tests can be a use­ful early in­di­ca­tor of prostate can­cer, which af­fects one in six men. The Amer­i­can Can­cer So­ci­ety rec­om­mends men dis­cuss the test with their doc­tor at age 50, though those with higher risk for prostate can­cer should start the dis­cus­sion ear­lier.

In Stiller’s case, he was given a PSA test for more than a year and a half. As In this file photo, Ben Stiller poses for pho­tog­ra­phers upon ar­rival at the pre­miere of the film “Zoolan­der No.2,” in Lon­don. In an es­say posted Tues­day, Oct. 4, on the web­site Medium, Stiller re­vealed that he bat­tled prostate can­cer in 2014, and he cred­its the test that di­ag­nosed the can­cer with sav­ing his life. his num­bers rose, Stiller was sent to a urol­o­gist for ex­am­i­na­tion, then given an MRI and even­tu­ally a biopsy that came back pos­i­tive.

“This is a com­pli­cated is­sue, and an evolv­ing one,” Stiller wrote. “But in this im­per­fect world, I be­lieve the best way to de­ter­mine a course of ac­tion for the most treat­able, yet deadly can­cer, is to de­tect it early.”

Stiller led the es­say with a photo of him­self, in a fa­mously painful en­counter with a pants zip­per, from “There’s Some­thing About Mary.”

PHOTO BY JOEL RYAN — INVISION — AP, FILE

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