Ac­tive wear has be­come ev­ery­day wear

Ac­tive wear has be­come ev­ery­day wear and can be a mo­ti­va­tor

Daily Local News (West Chester, PA) - - DAILY LOCAL NEWS - By Michilea Pat­ter­son mpat­ter­son@21st-cen­tu­ry­media.com @MichileaP on Twit­ter

A com­mon phrase states “we are what we eat” but what if that was changed to “we are what we wear.” Some say that wear­ing fit­ness cloth­ing, also known as ac­tive wear, can help mo­ti­vate peo­ple to make health­ier life­style changes.

The pop­u­lar­ity of fit­ness wear has in­creased greatly in the last few years. Ac­tive wear sales from July 2013 to June 2014 equaled $33.7 bil­lion which was 16 per­cent of the to­tal sales for the U.S. ap­parel mar­ket that year, ac­cord­ing to a 2014 press re­lease from The NPD Group, a global in­for­ma­tion com­pany that tracks con­sumer ser­vices.

Ac­tive wear like sweat shirts, yoga pants and leg­gings are no longer just for work­ing out but have evolved into cloth­ing for ev­ery­day ac­tiv­i­ties. Allyssa Man­ning is the mar­ket­ing di­rec­tor for RBX Ac­tive, a New York­based fit­ness brand.

“We’re re­ally driven by that idea that peo­ple should look and feel their best and they shouldn’t be em­bar­rassed about their ac­tive wear,” she said.

Man­ning said fit­ness cloth­ing is more than a trend but is now part of a life­style. She said the pop­u­lar­ity of ac­tive wear is part of a shift where peo­ple are be­ing more health con­scious and tak­ing steps to­ward a more ac­tive life. She said to­day’s fit­ness cloth­ing, es­pe­cially for women, is very stylish so they can be worn just about any­where.

“You’re wear­ing them to go get cof­fee. You’re wear­ing them to go to the gro­cery store. You’re wear­ing them to school and you’re wear­ing them to class,” Man­ning said.

She said ac­tive is now con­sid­ered very fash­ion­able. Peo­ple care about hav­ing up-to-date stylish fit­ness items in­clud­ing clothes and it helps mo­ti­vate them to make healthy changes, she ex­plained.

“When they make that small in­vest­ment (in clothes), it’s kind of a prom­ise to your­self that you’re go­ing to make other small baby steps,” Man­ning said.

A study con­ducted at North­west­ern Univer­sity of Illi­nois and pub­lished in a 2012 ar- ticle of the Jour­nal of Ex­per­i­men­tal So­cial found that the clothes peo­ple wear can af­fect the way peo­ple think. Ac­cord­ing to the arti- cle, the term “en­clothed cog­ni­tion” de­scribes “the sys­tem­atic in­flu- ence that clothes have on the wearer’s psy­cho­log­i­cal An ex­per­i­ment pro­cesses.” found that peo­ple who wore a lab coat were more at­ten­tive than those that didn’t sup­port­ing cog­ni­tion.” the idea of “en­clothed

Whether it’s be­cause wear­ing fit­ness ap­parel makes peo­ple want to ex­er­cise more or it’s now a trendy, fash­ion­able style, re­tail stores that fo­cus on ac­tive wear is be­com­ing very com­mon lo­cally.

RBX Ac­tive, which stands for Rugged Bear X-treme,” re­cently opened a store at the Philadel­phia Pre­mium Out­lets in Lim­er­ick. The store has ac­tive clothes for men, chil­dren and women in­clud­ing plus-sizes. The lo­cal out­let store also sells fit­ness ac­ces­sories like watches, yoga mats and re­sis­tance bands.

Man­ning said RBX founder and CEO Eli Ye­did cre­ated the brand as an ex­ten­sion of his chil­dren’s lifestye brand, The Rugged Bear. The core-mis­sion of RBX Ac­tive is “to make fit­ness and a healthy life­style ac­ces­si­ble to all,” Man­ning said. She said the goal is that peo­ple feel happy and re­freshed with they put on RBX cloth­ing and that af­ford­abil­ity isn’t a bar­rier to peo­ple’s fit­ness goals.

Founder Eli Ye­did said “RBX is the an­ti­dote to the ‘fit­ness is a lux­ury’ trend. We be­lieve that ev­ery­one has the right to feel con­fi­dent about the way that they look, and arm that and feel­ingsa leg.” shouldn’t cost an For more about RBX Ac­tivie, visit the web­site at www.rbx­ac­tive.com. Ad­di­tional ac­tive wear op­tions are found in the re­gion. For ex­am­ple: cloth­ing Katie com­pa­ny­for K. women.Ac­tive that is sells Thea Read­ing­based­fit­ness­brand pro­vides women with ac­tive wear that is stylish, trendy and fash­ion­able ac­cord­ing to the com­pany’s web­site. Cloth­ing sizes range from small to 3X. For more about the brand, visit the web­site at katiekac­tive.com or the Face­book page www.face­book.com/KatieKAc­tive. de­signs Ath­leta trendyis a sportswearfit­ness brand and that­ac­ces­sories for women. The brand is fo­cused on the women ath­lete but also has op­tions for girls. Sizes range from small to 2X. There’s a store lo­cated at 501 Wilm­ing­ton Pike, Glen Mills. For more in­for­ma­tion, visit the web­site at ath­leta.gap.com.

For more healthy liv­ing sto­ries, visit the Fit for Life web­site www. pottsmer­c­fit4life.com.

SUB­MIT­TED PHO­TOS — JOEL CALDWELL FOR RBX AC­TIVE

A model poses for a photo while wear­ing RBX Ac­tive cloth­ing from head to toe. The fit­ness wear brand also sells ac­ces­sories such as fit­ness watches, yoga mats and re­sis­tance bands.

MICHILEA PAT­TER­SON — DIG­I­TAL FIRST ME­DIA

Justin Meade, man­ager of the lo­cal ac­tive wear RBX re­tail store, hangs clothes. The store was re­cently opened in­side the Philadel­phia Pre­mium Out­lets in Lim­er­ick.

MICHILEA PAT­TER­SON — DIG­I­TAL FIRST ME­DIA

Ath­letic shoes are on dis­play at the re­tail store RBX.

SUB­MIT­TED PHOTO — JOEL CALDWELL FOR RBX AC­TIVE

A model wears RBX Ac­tive cloth­ing from head to toe while pos­ing for a photo. The fit­ness brand sells cloth­ing for men, women and chil­dren.

Fit­ness wear with mesh de­signs are a pop­u­lar fall trend for women’s fall fash­ion.

MICHILEA PAT­TER­SON — DIG­I­TAL FIRST ME­DIA

Gwen Stahl­necker, key holder at the ac­tive wear re­tail store RBX, folds clothes be­hind the counter. The fit­ness cloth­ing brand is now avail­able at the Philadel­phia Pre­mium Out­lets in Lim­er­ick.

SUB­MIT­TED PHOTO — JOEL CALDWELL FOR RBX AC­TIVE

A model wear RBX Ac­tive cloth­ing from head to toe. A fall trend for women fit­ness wear is the cowl-neck sweat­shirt.

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