Trump, Clin­ton of­fer a way for­ward to heal­ing

In speeches of­fered in vic­tory and de­feat on Wed­nes­day, Don­ald Trump and Hil­lary Clin­ton re­minded Amer­i­cans of one of the great truths of our na­tion:

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When the ar­gu­ing is done, when the elec­tions are over and the votes are counted, we are all Amer­i­cans.

When the ar­gu­ing is done, when the elec­tions are over and the votes are counted, we are all Amer­i­cans. We are the in­her­i­tors of a great and noble ex­per­i­ment in rep­re­sen­ta­tive democ­racy.

And with Don­ald Trump’s elec­tion as the na­tion’s 45th pres­i­dent on Tues­day, Amer­i­cans must once again honor that legacy, fought for and won with the blood of our sons and daugh­ters.

This is the time to set aside dif­fer­ences and wish him well, as an­other grand Amer­i­can tra­di­tion — the peace­ful tran­si­tion of power — be­gins. He is fac­ing no small task. While Trump won the Elec­toral Col­lege, Clin­ton as of this writ­ing, is lead­ing in the pop­u­lar vote.

But if some of the Clin­ton faith­ful plan to fight rather than sup­port the in­com­ing ad­min­is­tra­tion, we’d re­mind them of their can­di­date’s own words on Wed­nes­day.

Clin­ton said Amer­i­cans owe Trump “an open mind and a chance to lead.”

In these po­lar­ized times, when it’s easy to be­lieve that many Amer­i­cans are liv­ing on sep­a­rate plan­ets, we must rise up to ac­cept the re­quest Trump made dur­ing his mag­nan­i­mous vic­tory speech.

“For those who have not sup­ported me in the past, I’m reach­ing out to you for guid­ance and help in uni­fy­ing our great coun­try,” he said.

But loy­alty to the na­tion and re­spect for the of­fice of the pres­i­dent ought not to be con­strued as is­su­ing a blank check.

But when Amer­i­cans find them­selves in dis­agree­ment over pro­pos­als made by the new Pres­i­dent-elect, they must work to re­solve those dif­fer­ences with as lit­tle ac­ri­mony as pos­si­ble.

If Trump’s elec­tion is proof of noth­ing else, it is proof that Amer­i­cans have tired of the grid­lock on Capi­tol Hill; have grown weary of an un­re­spon­sive fed­eral bu­reau­cracy and be­lieve their voices are not heard in the halls of power.

It’s not enough to merely say “No,” and not of­fer a solution. Ac­tive par­tic­i­pa­tion in a democ­racy de­mands that we pro­vide work­able al­ter­na­tives in ar­eas where we find our­selves in dis­agree­ment.

In re­turn for this sup­port, Amer­i­cans have ev­ery right to de­mand a gov­ern­ment that treats each cit­i­zen, re­gard­less of race, creed, re­li­gion or economic sta­tion with ab­so­lute dig­nity and ab­so­lute re­spect.

Those aren’t mere words. They’re en­shrined in the Dec­la­ra­tion of In­de­pen­dence, which reads, in part: “Gov­ern­ments are in­sti­tuted among Men, de­riv­ing their just pow­ers from the con­sent of the gov­erned.”

So we gather to­day in op­ti­mism that the Pres­i­den­t­elect will honor those val­ues and be given the space to pur­sue his goals within those ideals.

If Trump’s elec­tion is proof of noth­ing else, it is proof that Amer­i­cans have tired of the grid­lock on Capi­tol Hill; have grown weary of an un­re­spon­sive fed­eral bu­reau­cracy and be­lieve their voices are not heard in the halls of power.

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