EVERY­WHERE YOU LOOK YOU FIND FOODS MADE WITH WHEAT. BUT WHEAT IS NOT WHAT IT USED TO BE

Delight Gluten Free - - Enlighten - BY CHRISTIANE NORTHRUP, M.D.

car­di­ol­o­gist Wil­liam Davis points out that the wheat we’re eat­ing to­day is a far cry from the wheat of 50 years ago; it has been ge­net­i­cally mod­i­fied al­most beyond recog­ni­tion. Wheat, and most other gluten-con­tain­ing grains, also con­tain a pro­tein called gliadin which is toxic to many cells in the body. When gliadin is in­gested, some of it in­evitably gets into the blood­stream. The im­mune sys­tem then marks it for de­struc­tion, but be­cause gliadin is very much like thy­roid tis­sue, that im­mune re­sponse can ad­versely af­fect the thy­roid gland as well as the gliadin. This sets up an in­flam­ma­tory re­sponse that de­stroys thy­roid tis­sue. Peo­ple with thy­roid prob­lems, in­clud­ing Graves’ dis­ease and Hashimoto’s thy­roidi­tis, should avoid gluten com­pletely. Not just a lit­tle. Com­pletely.

I have a good friend with a long his­tory of hy­pothy­roidism. She fol­lowed a diet plan with no gluten for a month and lost 20 pounds. She also felt fan­tas­tic. On a fam­ily va­ca­tion, she ate a muf­fin. And gained 10 pounds—within two days. She has a PHD in nu­tri­tion and is a nurse. She didn’t make this up. That one muf­fin set her sys­tem

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