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Hen, Camp­bell was di­ag­nosed with gluten in­tol­er­ance, some­thing ex­perts say can af­fect up to 30 per­cent of the pop­u­la­tion. Be­liev­ing what goes on, goes in, Camp­bell not only purged her diet of gluten, she over­hauled her makeup bag, hand­ing off any­thing tha

Delight Gluten Free - - Healthy Living -

GET OFF THE GLUTEN Not all der­ma­tol­o­gists agree that gluten can be ab­sorbed through the skin and no sci­en­tific study ex­ists that proves or dis­proves the the­ory, which leaves both pa­tients and doc­tors in gluten limbo. But Kath­leen Davis, MD, an in­te­gra­tive der­ma­tol­o­gist in New York City, tells peo­ple to avoid us­ing gluten on their skin if they think they’re al­ler­gic to it. Why take a chance? Rod­ney Ford, MD, a pe­di­atric gas­troen­terol­o­gist in New Zealand and au­thor of The Gluten Syn­drome and sev­eral other books re­lated to gluten sen­si­tiv­ity (dr­rod­ney­ford.com) doesn’t need pub­lished proof; he sees first­hand how gluten can af­fect the skin, from itch­ing to rashes. “I meet lit­er­ally thou­sands of chil­dren and adults with gluten prob­lems. Many of the chil­dren even have is­sues when they touch Play-doh, which is usu­ally made from wheat flour.” says Ford.

In­stead of wait­ing for proof, due dili­gence would dic­tate that any­one with a gluten in­tol­er­ance should avoid glu­ten­con­tain­ing beauty prod­ucts. That’s es­pe­cially true for those that could po­ten­tially be in­gested or in­haled, like lip­sticks, face wash, hand soap and cream, tooth­paste, mouth­wash, and hair spray.

But fear not: If you must avoid gluten in your skin­care prod­ucts, plenty of al­ter­na­tives of­fer sim­i­lar mois­tur­iz­ing and an­tiox­i­dant qual­i­ties to vi­ta­min E, packed wheat germ oil. Car­rots, pump­kins, pa­payas, and other fruits all pro­vide deluxe repar­a­tive treat­ment for skin and hair. Car­rots, for ex­am­ple, earn a place on the beauty all-star team be­cause they boast nour­ish­ing and an­ti­sep­tic prop­er­ties, mak­ing car­rot oil or ex­tract a cham­pion blem­ish de­fense. Pump­kin’s nat­u­ral UV pro­tec­tors and its anti-in­flam­ma­tory com­pounds makes it a per­fect op­tion for sen­si­tive skin, while pa­paya con­tains pa­payin, a nat­u­ral en­zyme that nim­bly ex­fo­li­ates, tight­ens, and re­gen­er­ates skin.

JAN­UARY - FE­BRU­ARY 2017

Vege­tar­ian Chick­pea Rice Bowl

YIELD: 4-6 SERV­INGS PREP TIME: 10 MIN­UTES TO­TAL TIME: 55 MIN­UTES GLUTEN-FREE, DAIRY-FREE, EGG-FREE, SOY-FREE, NUT-FREE, CORN-FREE

3 cups wa­ter 1 cup pump­kin puree ¾ tea­spoon salt ½ tea­spoon olive oil 2 gar­lic cloves, minced 1 bay leaf 1 cup shred­ded car­rots 1 cup shred­ded but­ter­nut squash ½ cup frozen spinach ½ tea­spoon oregano ½ tea­spoon pars­ley ¼ tea­spoon co­rian­der 1 29–ounce can chick­peas, drained 4-6 cups fresh spinach 4-6 cups cooked brown rice Pump­kin seeds, for gar­nish

1. In a large pot, bring wa­ter to a boil. Add the pump­kin puree, salt and olive oil. Whisk un­til the pump­kin has dis­solved.

2. Add the gar­lic, bay leaf, car­rots, but­ter­nut squash, spinach, oregano, pars­ley and co­rian­der. Mix un­til com­bined thor­oughly and cook over medium-high heat un­til veg­gies are soft, about 20 min­utes.

3. Stir in the chick­peas and con­tinue to cook for 10 to 15 min­utes.

4. Di­vide the spinach and brown rice into serv­ing bowls. Top with chick­pea stew and gar­nish with pump­kin seeds. Serve im­me­di­ately.

NU­TRI­TION PER SERV­ING: CALO­RIES: 368, FAT: 5G, SAT­U­RATED FAT 1G, CHOLES­TEROL: 0MG, SODIUM: 723MG, CAR­BO­HY­DRATES: 70G, FIBER: 10G, SU­GARS: 2G, PRO­TEIN: 13G

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