TRAC­TOR TALK

1978 IH 584 UTIL­ITY

Diesel World - - Contents - BY JIM ALLEN

NNo mat­ter how hot the horse­power race got with big trac­tors, a good deal of any trac­tor com­pany’s busi­ness were the smaller util­ity trac­tors. Solid prod­ucts in this cat­e­gory al­ways made for a health­ier com­pany. As the ’80s ap­proached, In­ter­na­tional Har­vester re­al­ized it was time to up­date its 64 and 74 Se­ries small trac­tors and for 1977 and 1978, the 84 Se­ries trac­tors de­buted.

The 84 lineup com­prised seven ba­sic mod­els with a range of con­fig­u­ra­tions for each. Power out­puts ranged from 36 to 73 hp. The small­est was the 384 with a 154ci, 36hp diesel four. The 484 made 42 hp from a 179ci 3-cylin­der diesel. The 584 had 52 hp

from a 206ci diesel four. A 684 model had a 239ci, 63hp diesel. The 784 had a 246ci diesel that made 67 PTO hp. The Big Dog was the 884, which didn’t come to the line un­til 1980 with a 268ci, 73hp four. There was also a Hy­dro 84, which used a 246ci four cou­pled to a ver­sion of IH’S hy­dro­static drive, and it cranked out 59 PTO hp. There was a small 284 too, but it was more a lawn and gar­den trac­tor and not re­ally a main­stream ag trac­tor, although it’s some­times listed as such.

Many of the 84 Se­ries were avail­able in Util­ity or Rowcrop con­fig­u­ra­tions. The 584, 684, 784, 884 and Hy­dro 84 came both ways but the oth­ers came only as Util­i­ties. The main dif­fer­ence was ad­justable wheel track. The 84 line was built in the IH Don­caster, Eng­land, fac­tory and most of the en­gines used came from the IH Neuss en­gine fac­tory in Ger­many.

The 584 was the mid­dle sib­ling in the 84 line and pop­u­lar all over the world. It was pow­ered by a Neuss D206, 206ci four­cylin­der, di­rect-in­jected, wet-sleeved diesel. Neuss rated it at 57-65 fly­wheel horse­power (de­pend­ing on rpm) and it cranked out 52.54 PTO horse­power in a 1979 Ne­braska Trac­tor Test. It was a five-main en­gine with the gen­eral ar­chi­tec­ture of the Neuss D310 sixes also use in larger IH trac­tors of the re­cent past.

The 584 used an 8-speed gear­box, four speeds in the main box with a 2-speed range box. It didn’t have a TA (Torque Am­pli­fier, aka “Torque”). It came as a fixed-track Util­ity or as a Rowcrop with an ad­justable track. A 540rpm live PTO was com­mon on the Rowcrops as was a 3-point lift. It came stan­dard with power steer­ing, a diff-lock and ROPS (Rollover Pro­tec­tion Sys­tem). A canopy was avail­able but no cabs on the 584. Cabs were of­fered for the larger 84 Se­ries, and in the early ’80s, the 84 line could be or­dered with Front-wheel As­sist (FWA).

Most of the 84 Se­ries trac­tors lasted to 1984 and were sold into 1985, when the merger with Case took place. It could be said that these were the last small trac­tors built by In­ter­na­tional Har­vester and they have been called among their best.

This trac­tor is owned by Gavin Knisely, a well-known South­ern Ohio head-port­ing pro. It’s a show trac­tor that works, or a work trac­tor that shows. Ei­ther way, it’s handy for him at his ru­ral shop. The dif­fer­ence be­tween a Util­ity and Rowcrop was get­ting pretty blurry when this ’78 rolled off the line. Less and less was me­chan­i­cal row cul­ti­va­tion done, which re­quired the wheel track to match the crop row widths. Ad­justable-tread trac­tors were not needed as cul­ti­va­tion be­gan to be done chem­i­cally more than me­chan­i­cally. A Util­ity could have all the other fea­tures of the Rowcrop, in­clud­ing PRO, 3-point, and even the weight bracket. A few years af­ter this trac­tor was built, IH in­tro­duced a 584 with FWA, as well as a low-pro­file trac­tor for or­chard work, turf use, or use as an in­dus­trial.

Well-equipped, with a 540 RPM PTO and a three-point lift. One of the de­sign fea­tures of the 84 Se­ries placed the fuel tank in the rear, where the ex­tra weight of the 20 gal­lons gave added trac­tion. Be­cause the 584 was a “world” trac­tor, it had fea­tures like rear lights, which were not re­quired in the United States.

 The Neuss D206 was es­sen­tially a D310 six with two cylin­ders lopped off. Or you could say the D310 was a D206 with two jugs added. Both these en­gines shared a lot with the D239 four and D258 six, which had the same bore but a longer stroke (5.06 vs. 4.375 inches). The D206 and D310 were ear­lier de­signs. There were a lot of parts in­ter­changes within this en­gine fam­ily. The D206 saw use in a few other IH in­dus­trial ap­pli­ca­tions but we couldn’t find any road ap­pli­ca­tions for it. It did have a higher power rat­ing than seen in trac­tors, 65 hp at 2,500 rpm. Torque was the same as the trac­tors 148 lb-ft at 1,600-2,200. The Neuss D358 six had a road rat­ing that spun it up to 3,000 rpm. There is no record of a turbo ver­sion of this en­gine but a tur­bocharged DT239 was built. The D206 was pro­duced into the mid ’90s.

The D206 was eco­nom­i­cal, a Neuss trait, and re­li­able. It also shared an­other gen­eral Neuss trait... cold blood­ed­ness. They were not great cold starters due to their ex­cep­tion­ally low 15.3:1 com­pres­sion ra­tio. A fully warmed-up Neuss barely even sounds like a diesel. Re­place­ment pis­ton and liner kits usu­ally bump that ra­tio up to about 16:1, which helps on the cold starts. In trac­tors, these en­gines were rated at 2,300 rpm and about 60 fly­wheel horse­power. Bosch pumps were used, a VA4-100H in this case, and Bosch DLLA injectors. The block heater is a vi­tal ne­ces­sity in cold cli­mates.

 An im­pres­sive “rack.” Doubt­ful this 584 needs 800 lbs of weight up front but per­haps it’s just a place to store the 100-lb suit­case weights. The 584 Util­ity mod­els could be dis­tin­guished mainly by their swept-back front axles, non-ad­justable wheel track and ex­haust sys­tem that ex­ited low rather than up.

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