Iron­man races gen­er­ate $5.47 mil­lion for re­gion

IRONClub un­veils new sculp­ture

Dorchester Star - - Front Page - By DUSTIN HOLT dholt@ches­pub.com

CAM­BRIDGE — An eco­nomic study about the im­pact of the two Iron­man races in Dorch­ester County re­vealed the races at­tracted about 3,500 par­tic­i­pates in 2015 and gen­er­ated $5.47 mil­lion for the re­gion.

The study was re­leased Mon­day, May 9, at the Dorch­ester Vis­i­tors Cen­ter in Cam­bridge by IRONClub Mary­land, the non­profit or­ga­ni­za­tion formed to sup­port large-scale, high-im­pact en­durance events in Dorch­ester County.

“The races have a tremen­dous im­pact on the com­mu­nity eco­nomic-wise,” said Dorch­ester Cham­ber of Com­merce Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor Bill Christo­pher. “It brings a lot of peo­ple in. If only 1 per­cent of those peo­ple like the county and de­cide to stay, we just in­creased the pop­u­la­tion, tax base and busi­nesses that come in.

“It is a won­der­ful thing for the com­mu­nity, plus the over­all pub­lic­ity it brings in,” he said. “Even though the 2015 Iron­man was de­layed by two weeks for se­vere weather, it still had a sig­nif­i­cant im­pact.”

The or­ga­ni­za­tion also un­veiled a lo­cally-fab­ri­cated metal Iron­man sculp­ture made by Cam­bridge In­ter­na­tional. The sculp­ture is large and three­d­i­men­sional with a new Mary­land de­sign.

Cam­bridge hosted Iron­man Mary­land in 2015 for the sec­ond-straight year in Oc­to­ber. Iron­man Mary­land is one of only 12 full-dis­tance Iron­man triathlons in North Amer­ica.

The triathlon of­fers 30-age-group qual­i­fy­ing slots to the Iron­man World Cham­pi­onship tak­ing place in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii.

Iron­man Mary­land kicks off with a 2.4-mile swim in the Chop­tank River. The 112-mile bike takes ath­letes through Dorch­ester County and into the Black­wa­ter Na­tional Wildlife Refuge. The 26.2-mile run goes through Cam­bridge city limits.

New Zealan­der Tim Smith fin­ished first in 2015, cov­er­ing 140 miles in 8 hours, 38 min­utes, and 21 sec­onds.

Christina Lauer, of Wash­ing­ton, D.C., was the fastest fe­male with a time of 9:42:56.

The 2016 edi­tion of Iron­man Mary­land will be held Oct. 1.

Dorch­ester County also hosts the Ea­gleMan Iron­man 70.3 each June. The 19th edi­tion is slated for June 12 in Cam­bridge.

“On be­half of Dorch­ester County and IRONClub Mary­land, thank you for ral­ly­ing be­hind IIron­man and en­thu­si­as­ti­cally sup­port­ing our lo­cal booster club,” said Dorch­ester Tourism Di­rec­tor and board mem­ber Amanda Fen­ster­maker. “Over the past two years, more than 300 mem­bers raised over $100,000 in pri­vate con­tri­bu­tions to­ward li­cens­ing fees and lever­aged that sup­port with do­na­tions, in-kind ser­vices and vol­un­teerism. To­gether, we’ve in­creased our in­vest­ment 100-fold, gen­er­at­ing $10 mil­lion for our econ­omy in only two short years.”

Pro­duced by Sal­is­bury Univer­sity’s BEA­CON Cen­ter un­der the di­rec­tion of Memo Diriker, the “IRON­MAN Races in Dorch­ester County: 2015 Eco­nomic Im­pact” re­ported the events con­trib­uted $5.47 mil­lion to the lo­cal econ­omy.

Ac­cord­ing to the study, an es­ti­mated 10,000 ath­letes and guests from around the world came to Dorch­ester County last sum­mer and fall for the races. Two events col­lec­tively drew 3,500 par­tic­i­pants — 2,100 for Ea­gleMan and 1,400 for Iron­man Mary­land, even though the race was post­poned due to se­vere weather.

The study found 88 per­cent of Iron­man Mary­land ath­letes and 70 per­cent of Ea­gleMan en­tries trav­eled dis­tances greater than 100 miles to par­tic­i­pate. Iron­man ath­letes were ac­com­pa­nied by 2.5 guests on av­er­age and Ea­gleMan ath­letes had 1.7 guests on av­er­age.

Ac­cord­ing to the study, Iron­man ath­letes/guests stayed an av­er­age of four nights; double that of Ea­gleMan.

“The days around the races bring my res­tau­rants the big­gest crowds we get all year,” said Pa­trick Fan­ning, chef and co-Owner of High Spot, Stoked, Black Water and Rock Lob­stah in Cam­bridge. “The rac­ers bring their friends and fam­ily and many ath­letes come back to visit or train.”

Fen­ster­maker rec­og­nized new 2016 IRONClub mem­bers in­clud­ing the Hy­att Re­gency Ch­e­sa­peake Bay and the Nathan Foun­da­tion, which each con­trib­uted $5,000 to sup­port the event. She wel­comed Cam­bridge Multi-Sport Pres­i­dent Michael Keene who in­tro­duced new club mem­ber Sara Let­telleir.

Keene and Let­teleir used the oc­ca­sion to an­nounce the re­cip­i­ents of CMS’s schol­ar­ships to Cam­bridge-South Dorch­ester High stu­dent Pa­trick ...

PHOTO BY DUSTIN HOLT

IRONClub Mary­land mem­bers, lo­cal dig­ni­taries and com­mu­nity lead­ers pose with the new lo­cally-fab­ri­cated metal Iron­man sculp­ture made by Cam­bridge In­ter­na­tional dur­ing a Mon­day cer­e­mony at Sail­winds Park in Cam­bridge.

PHOTO BY DUSTIN HOLT

IRONClub Mary­land mem­bers, lo­cal dig­ni­taries and com­mu­nity lead­ers pose with the new lo­cally-fab­ri­cated metal Iron­man sculp­ture made by Cam­bridge In­ter­na­tional dur­ing a Mon­day cer­e­mony at Sail­winds Park in Cam­bridge.

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