BONE SPAVIN

EQUUS - - Conformation Insights -

Black Hawk’s left hock (B) shows no pathol­ogy. In con­trast, a left hock (A) of an anony­mous mu­seum spec­i­men shows the char­ac­ter­is­tic ap­pear­ance of “bone spavin” on the front, rear and lat­eral as­pects of the limb at the base of the hock joint. At the front of the joint (top) the deep lig­a­ment fibers (red ar­row) have mum­mi­fied but are other­wise nor­mal. In the rear view of this joint, the pock­et­like facets are for the first tarsal bone, which was par­tially fused with the pan­cake-like sec­ond and third tarsal bones; it has bro­ken off post­mortem from the area in­di­cated (yel­low ar­row). These bones fuse in half of all do­mes­tic horses, so the de­gree of spavin pathol­ogy here is low. None­the­less the os­si­fi­ca­tion of the deep lig­a­ment fibers sur­round­ing this joint is clear (blue ar­row). There is no ev­i­dence of bone spavin in Ethan Allen’s hocks; seen here are the first tarsal bone (A), the top sur­face of hind can­non bone (B) and a rear view of the hind can­non bone (C).

This x-ray im­age shows “bone spavin.”

Lex­ing­ton’s left and right hocks (in rear view) show no pathol­ogy. LEFT HIND RIGHT HIND VIEW DI­RECTLY FROM REAR

ETHAN ALLEN: HOCK COM­PO­NENTS

ROLF: LOWER BONES OF THE HOCK

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