NEW WAY TO MON­I­TOR GUT AC­TIV­ITY

EQUUS - - Medical Front -

An im­proved method of as­sess­ing the ac­tiv­ity in a horse’s gut may be avail­able in the fu­ture.

Gas­troin­testi­nal motil­ity ---the move­ments of a horse’s di­ges­tive sys­tem and the flow of its con­tents---can be an im­por­tant in­di­ca­tor of the sever­ity of colic or the sta­tus of a horse’s re­cov­ery from colic surgery. A healthy gut is con­tin­u­ously mov­ing in­gesta through the in­testines, a process that pro­duces dis­tinc­tive sounds. Cur­rently, the only way a vet­eri­nar­ian can check on a horse’s in­testi­nal motil­ity is to lis­ten for gut sounds with a stetho­scope or use an ul­tra­sound ma­chine to look for move­ment, a process that re­lies on anal­y­sis of a “snap­shot in time” of the on­go­ing con­di­tions.

How­ever, the use of non­in­va­sive acous­tic gas­troin­testi­nal surveil­lance (AGIS) biosen­sors, orig­i­nally de­signed for use in peo­ple, may al­low for con­tin­ual, ob­jec­tive mon­i­tor­ing of gut ac­tiv­ity in the horse. When placed against the skin over the ar­eas to be mon­i­tored, the sen­sors “lis­ten” con­tin­u­ally for gut noises within. The in­for­ma­tion is sent to a com­puter, which an­a­lyzes the data in real time to de­ter­mine if gut ac­tiv­ity has slowed or stopped.

Re­searchers at the Univer­sity of Penn­syl­va­nia’s New Bolton Cen­ter re­cently tested AGIS on six healthy horses. The horses were fit­ted with AGIS sen­sors and were ran­domly treated with xy­lazine, a drug known to slow gut motil­ity, or saline to serve as the con­trol group. Re­searchers who did not know which treat­ment each horse re­ceived then used stetho­scopes and ul­tra­sound to as­sess gut motil­ity. The pro­to­col was fol­lowed twice; once af­ter the horses were fed and again af­ter they were fasted.

A com­par­i­son of the data col­lected from the sen­sors and the ob­ser­va­tions made by the ve­teri­nar­i­ans showed that the AGIS sys­tem iden­ti­fied which horses had re­ceived the gut­slow­ing drug with ac­cu­racy sim­i­lar to that achieved by ve­teri­nar­i­ans us­ing a stetho­scope and ul­tra­sound.

Ref­er­ence: “As­sess­ing gas­troin­testi­nal motil­ity in healthy horses com­par­ing aus­cul­ta­tion, ul­tra­sonog­ra­phy and an acous­tic gas­troin­testi­nal surveil­lance biosen­sor: A ran­dom­ized, blinded, con­trolled cross­over proof of prin­ci­ple study,” Equine Vet­eri­nary Jour­nal, July 2018

The use of non­in­va­sive acous­tic gas­troin­testi­nal surveil­lance (AGIS) biosen­sors, orig­i­nally de­signed for use in peo­ple, may al­low for con­tin­ual, ob­jec­tive mon­i­tor­ing of gut ac­tiv­ity in the horse.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.