FIVE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT SER­VICE DOGS:

FLUX Hawaii - - FEATURES -

ONE

They are not re­quired to wear a vest, nor is their owner re­quired to carry the dog’s iden­ti­fi­ca­tion on his or her per­son, to be per­mit­ted ac­cess in pub­lic.

TWO

They are al­ways work­ing. Do not pet or talk to the an­i­mal, which dis­tracts from the job he or she is tasked with.

THREE

They are not car­ried in a purse or stroller. “A dog has gotta have four feet on the floor, oth­er­wise how’s it gonna help ya?” Luehrs says.

FOUR

Guide dogs for the blind and visu­ally im­paired are the high­est trained type of as­sis­tance dogs, fol­lowed by hear­ing dogs for the deaf, and ser­vice dogs, which are trained for a spe­cific task that mit­i­gates the per­son’s dis­abil­ity. Ther­apy or emo­tional-sup­port dogs do not have to be trained, and their de­fined func­tion is to pro­vide com­fort.

FIVE

Ser­vice dog “train­ing” does not in­clude be­ing able to shake, kiss, or speak on com­mand. The fun­da­men­tal tasks of ser­vice dogs in­clude pro­vid­ing coun­ter­bal­ance sup­port, lead­ing dis­ori­ented han­dlers to a des­ig­nated place, con­duct­ing room searches for han­dlers with PTSD un­able to en­ter his or her own home, and re­triev­ing items.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.