FAKE NEWSSTAND

Tony stark, Bruce Wayne and other fic­tional Forbes cov­ers from Hol­ly­wood.

Forbes - - CONTENTS -

IN 1987, FORBES AND FOR­TUNE FOUGHT over a high-pro­file fic­tional scoop—a cover story on Gor­don Gekko. Both mag­a­zines were vy­ing for a cameo in Oliver Stone’s Wall Street, and de­liv­er­ing a fake cover fea­tur­ing Michael Dou­glas as the leg­endary cor­po­rate raider (as well as some ac­tual pro­mo­tional ads) was the price of ad­mis­sion. In the end, For­tune pro­duced that Gekko cover for Stone, but over the 30 years since we all learned that greed is good, Forbes has played a prom­i­nent role in the faux back­sto­ries of other moviedom moguls.

Many cov­ers—in­clud­ing Bruce Wayne from the Bat­man films and Tony Stark from the first Iron Man movie—were cre­ated with­out Forbes’ knowl­edge. (Which ex­plains why Stark’s

first Forbes cover also in­cludes a glar­ing typo in its cover line— “Tony Stark Takes Reigns at 21.” It’s spelled “reins.”)

Other cov­ers—in­clud­ing Melissa Mc­carthy as Michelle Dar­nell for The Boss, Jamie Foxx as Pres­i­dent James Sawyer in White House Down and Steve Martin as Norm Oglesby in Billy Lynn’s Long Half­time Walk— were cre­ated with per­mis­sion.

For 2016’s Gold, a 1980s vin­tage cover was de­signed to ex­act­ing stan­dards to show Matthew Mc­conaughey’s ca­reer arc as Kenny Wells. Not only is the logo cor­rect for 1988, but the cover price ($3.75) is ac­cu­rate for the year.

And some­times an ac­tual Forbes cover is re-cre­ated to give verisimil­i­tude to a film that’s based on a true story. Movie au­di­ences saw a dou­ble take of Bene­dict Cum­ber­batch as Ju­lian As­sange (with per­fectly repli­cated cover lines from the real 2010 cover) in the 2013 film The Fifth Es­tate.

As for Gor­don Gekko, Forbes even­tu­ally caught up with him in 2010. Timed to the re­lease of Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps, Forbes In­dia ran a cover story fea­tur­ing Michael Dou­glas that de­clared: “Greed Is Back.” There was no fol­low-up, how­ever, on the fate of Blues­tar Air­lines or Ana­cott Steel.

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