SPRING­ING FOR­WARD

Forbes - - Investing -

IS IT TIME TO MAKE THE LEAP TO A JUMP- HOUR WATCH?

Time flies, of course, but did you know it can also jump? The jump-hour time­piece dates to the 19th cen­tury, and most mod­ern ver­sions are based on a func­tion patented for the pocket watch by Aus­trian en­gi­neer Josef Pall­we­ber in 1883. Un­like a tra­di­tional watch, which has a sweep­ing hour hand, Pall­we­ber’s in­no­va­tion fea­tured a num­bered disc in an aper­ture that “jumped” to the next hour af­ter 60 min­utes. (It also had a jump­ing min­utes win­dow.) To­day there are many vari­a­tions on the jump hour, in­clud­ing mod­els with a minute hand or a tour­bil­lon—and IWC’S Trib­ute to Pall­we­ber Edi­tion “150 Years,” which looks re­mark­ably like the orig­i­nal pocket watch that got the jump on all of them.

CLOCK­WISE FROM TOP RIGHT: 45MM IWC TRIB­UTE TO PALL­WE­BER EDI­TION “150 YEARS” IN STAINLESS STEEL BY IWC ($23,100); 44.2MM ZEITWERK STRIK­ING TIME IN WHITE GOLD BY A. LANGHE & SOHNE ($119,000); 42MM VILLERET TOUR­BIL­LON VOLANT HEURE SAUTANTE MINUTE RÉTROGRADE IN RED GOLD BY BLANC­PAIN ($148,800); 42MM PRO­JECT Z12 IN ZALIUM BY HARRY WIN­STON ($24,800): 41MM OCTO MASERATI GRANLUSSO IN PINK GOLD BY BUL­GARI ($30,700); 43MM SALTHORA META X TRANS­PAR­ENT IN STAINLESS STEEL BY MEIS­TERSINGER ($4,500).

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