HONG KONG

Frequent Flyer Destinations - - 24 HOURS -

Hong Kong is a cos­mopoli­tan jun­gle, one of the most ex­cit­ing and vi­brant cities in Asia, with a show-stop­ping sky­line, a leg­endary restau­rant, a wild coast­line and beau­ti­ful coun­try­side.

High fi­nance and high fash­ion col­lide amidst the soar­ing sky­scrapers of this cul­ture cap­i­tal, charm­ing colo­nial sights and ex­otic nightlife alike are dot­ted through­out the city.

Once you’ve spent 24 hours in Hong Kong, ex­pe­ri­enced the city’s unique culi­nary, fash­ion, out­door and kid-friendly ex­pe­ri­ences, you’ll def­i­nitely want to come back.

PLACES TO STAY

Ritz Carl­ton – Si­t­u­ated on the 103rd floor, in one of the World’s tallest build­ings, on Hong Kong’s Kowloon side with spectacular views over the city and Vic­to­ria Har­bor, the Ritz Carl­ton cer­tainly has a ‘wow’ fac­tor. Fa­cil­i­ties on site are spectacular, in­clud­ing the World’s high­est swim­ming pool and se­ri­ous spa with Har­bour View treat­ment rooms. Din­ing

op­tions in­clude Miche­lin-starred Chi­nese and Ital­ian restau­rants and the rooftop bar, Ozone, is one of the city’s most pop­u­lar due to its lo­ca­tion on the 118th floor.

Up­per House – The Up­per House is a slick prop­erty with some of the best views from Hong Kong Is­land. The in­te­ri­ors are the work of Chi­nese de­signed An­dre Fu and has a bou­tique-min­i­mal­ist feel, but with a cozy warmth and charm. The ex­quis­ite rooms and suites are dec­o­rated with best qual­ity ma­te­ri­als, and clever de­sign max­i­mizes space. Such lux­u­ries as

com­pli­men­tary mini bars, cozy seat­ing and a li­brary to en­force the com­pany’s ‘house’ phi­los­o­phy.

Land­mark – Lo­cated in the heart of Hong Kong’s busi­ness and fash­ion dis­tricts, The Land­mark Man­darin Ori­en­tal is one of the most lux­u­ri­ous ho­tels in the world. This sleek ur­ban ho­tel, set above the Land­mark Mall ex­udes style, so­phis­ti­ca­tion and seren­ity, and is famed for its im­pec­ca­ble cus­tomer ser­vice. Dazzling din­ing op­tions are at the con­tem­po­rary French restau­rant, Am­ber, and trendy Mo Bar, one of Hong Kong’s hottest din­ing and drink­ing spots.

WHERE TO EAT

Mott 32 – Lo­cated in the base­ment of the Stan­dard Char­tered Build­ing, you are trans­ported into an un­ex­pect­edly chic and re­fined space. The menu con­sists of de­li­cious and unique dim sum com­bi­na­tions, and some of the crispi­est and best suck­ling pork you’ve ever tasted. For those who didn’t get a chance to go to Bei­jing ahead of time, they also serve the best Pek­ing duck in the city.

Otto E Mezzo – Lo­cated in­side the fash­ion­able Land­mark shop­ping ar­cade, Otto E Mezzo serves some of the best Ital­ian food in the city. The at­mos­phere is so­phis­ti­cated and is a place where both busi­ness­men and Hong Kong so­cialites alike gather for a late evening meal or drink at the bar.

Lung King Heen – Ex­ec­u­tive Chef, Chan Yan Tak was the first Chi­nese chef to re­ceive 3 Miche­lin stars. Lo­cated in­side the Four Sea­sons Ho­tel, the restau­rant is ele­gant but has the en­er­getic buzz of a restau­rant in Hong Kong.

Penin­sula Ho­tel – First time vis­i­tors will want to in­dulge in the af­ter­noon tea at this Hong Kong land­mark. Although wait times are long, and the lobby is full of tourists want­ing to par­take in this tra­di­tion, it is a mag­nif­i­cent ex­pe­ri­ence and one not to be missed.

SHOP­PING

The cen­ter of town boasts some of the best shop­ping in the world and spectacular an­tique shop­ping on Hol­ly­wood Road. On the far side of the har­bor in Tsim Sha Tsui are a fur­ther range of bou­tiques, depart­ment stores and other re­tail out­lets, all grouped un­der a sin­gle roof in Har­bour City. Af­ter dark, the rowdy Tem­ple Street Night Mar­ket in Kowloon comes alive with am­ple stalls sell­ing weird and won­der­ful food­stuffs, coun­ter­feit goods and ob­scure po­tions. Have your for­tune told, lis­ten to opera singers busk­ing and watch games of Chi­nese chess played out with in­tense con­cen­tra­tion.

CUL­TURE

Hong Kong has a dy­namic cul­tural scene traced back to its Chi­nese roots, colo­nial con­nec­tions and the con­tri­bu­tions of its home-grown tal­ent. From Asia’s top film fes­ti­val to Tai Chi at dawn to the drum­beat of a dragon boat. Soak up in­die mu­sic

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