Ta­mara San­tibanez

Brook­lyn

Gervois - - Editorial Content -

“For this solo in­stal­la­tion, I recre­ated a teenage bed­room and its con­tents. Reimag­ined in all white, the posters, records, zines, and other me­dia are re­pro­duced as ball­point draw­ings and the stud­ded belts and bracelets are sculpted from clay. The room is si­mul­ta­ne­ously semi­au­to­bi­o­graph­i­cal, in­clud­ing items I can re­mem­ber own­ing through­out my life, and gen­er­al­ized, al­low­ing view­ers to re­call their own ex­pe­ri­ences in re­la­tion to the space. The au­di­ence is in­vited to spec­u­late as to the iden­tity of the room’s in­hab­i­tant, read­ing cues from its con­tents as to their age, gen­der, race, and in­ter­ests. The room func­tions as both ar­chae­o­log­i­cal site and mem­ory made real. The items can be read as fos­sils or as props in a dream state. In painstak­ingly re­draw­ing these items from my youth, I pay homage to them and re­visit their mean­ing to me as an adult. I ap­ply the medium of ball­point pen and the use of white as a back­drop as a way to ref­er­ence de­vo­tion, tra­di­tional Chi­canx art medi­ums, high school note­book doo­dles born of bore­dom, and my early ex­pe­ri­ences en­coun­ter­ing punk as a space of white­ness. In this process I am at­tempt­ing to rec­on­cile my iden­tity as a Chi­canx raised in the South­east with the pro­found im­pact punk had on my pol­i­tics and way of life. Named af­ter a lyric from a song by Sui­ci­dal Ten­den­cies, the show ti­tle ref­er­ences the space young punks in­habit be­tween ju­ve­nile en­nui and the very real sense, sub­con­scious though it may be, of the op­pres­sive forces that shape our worlds.”

Ta­mara San­tibanez

Solo in­stal­la­tion with Cas­tor Gallery, Spring/Break Art Fair 2017

Think­ing About Ev­ery­thing, but Then Again, I was Think­ing About Noth­ing

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