MEAT AND POTA­TOES. LASERGRIPS AND MY .45.

ANY SCE­NARIO THAT PLACES YOU OR YOUR LOVED ONES IN HARM’S WAY RE­QUIRES PLAN­NING IF YOU’RE GO­ING TO GET OUT OF IT ALIVE.

Gun World - - Train -

Wouldn’t it be nice if we could pre­dict the fu­ture? We could win the lottery! Even bet­ter, we could avoid emer­gen­cies and catas­tro­phes by not be­ing around when they oc­cur. We could stay off the road if we knew there was go­ing to be an accident, and we’d stay away from the coast when a hur­ri­cane was about to hit.

Un­for­tu­nately, life doesn’t work that way, so we must be pre­pared the best we can and have plans in place to try to deal with any con­tin­gency. Plan­ning and do­ing drills isn’t as “sexy” as buy­ing gear, build­ing a fortress or deck­ing out your bug-out ve­hi­cle. How­ever, it’s as im­por­tant—if not more so—than just about any­thing you can do to be pre­pared for what’s ahead.

Any sce­nario that places you or your loved ones in harm’s way re­quires a plan. It is my be­lief that even though you might not be a prep­per, per se, it’s good medicine to be able to know what steps to take ahead of time should the need ever arise.

For me and my fam­ily, plan­ning re­quires the right gear to deal with a sit­u­a­tion, a way for all in­volved to han­dle the sce­nario, and con­stant drills and re­hearsals to get it right.

For the sake of this ar­ti­cle, I’m not nec­es­sar­ily talk­ing about long-term plan­ning. It doesn’t take a pan­demic or EMP to put the ones you love in dan­ger; it could be a fire, an earth­quake, a home in­va­sion or an evac­u­a­tion.

How ready are you to com­pe­tently han­dle even these short­term even­tu­al­i­ties? Let’s take a look at a few sce­nar­ios and dis­cuss what can be done to be ready for them.

The first step is to be ready with the gear that could help save lives. In the case of a fire, a pru­dent mea­sure would be to have fire ex­tin­guish­ers stored through­out the house—not just in the kitchen—be­cause fires can hap­pen any­where. An­other wise choice would be to also have smoke hoods stored. In the event of a fire, a per­son can don one of these hoods and be pro­vided with fil­tra­tion so they don’t im­me­di­ately suc­cumb to the smoke.

What if you are stuck on the sec­ond floor? Have an es­cape plan ready, such as a chain lad­der that can fit over a win­dowsill so you can climb to safety. Have a wreck­ing bar(s) ready to bust out win­dows and sills to pro­vide enough room for adults to quickly exit.

Some of this seems sim­ple, and some sounds far-fetched. But how far-fetched would some­thing have to be for you not to take pre­cau­tions to save your fam­ily?

Next come the ac­tual plans to deal with the event:

Make sure chil­dren know how to stay un­der the smoke. Teach and show them how to stop, drop and roll to put out a fire that’s on their per­son.

Have a spe­cific plan for how each per­son is to get out. A gen­er­al­ized plan for the group isn’t good enough.

Make sure ev­ery­one knows where to meet.

Some con­sid­er­a­tion should be given to what could hap­pen dur­ing an emer­gency so ev­ery­one knows how to deal with it.

Fi­nally, re­hears­ing the plans should be fre­quent and con­ducted in a man­ner that’s as close to re­al­ity as one could pos­si­bly get. Just like mus­cle mem­ory that is de­vel­oped when shoot­ing, be­ing able to deal with a life-threat­en­ing event is eas­ier if ev­ery­thing has been drilled over and over.

HOME IN­VA­SION

A house fire is an ob­vi­ous ex­am­ple, but it’s up to you to imag­ine what other sce­nar­ios might be­set your fam­ily and how to be ready for those, as well.

... BE­ING ABLE TO

DEAL WITH A LIFETHREAT­EN­ING EVENT IS EAS­IER IF EV­ERY­THING HAS BEEN DRILLED OVER AND OVER.

For in­stance, how pre­pared are you for a home in­va­sion? Do you have a read­ily ac­ces­si­ble firearm in each room? I ask, be­cause you don’t know where you’ll be in your house if it hap­pens—but I can al­most guar­an­tee you won’t be sit­ting next to your gun safe.

If you have chil­dren and can’t have firearms scat­tered about, that’s OK; con­sider putting a hand­gun safe in each room. That can be pricey, though. A cheap so­lu­tion is to carry a weapon on your per­son when you’re in your home.

An­other so­lu­tion is a safe room. If you have one, make sure ev­ery­one knows to use it when the time comes. Don’t count on be­ing able to get your chil­dren to the safe room your­self, how­ever. Your chil­dren should know where it is, how to ac­cess it and how to se­cure it, once in­side.

This type of think­ing ap­plies to ev­ery­thing that could hap­pen. Even nat­u­ral dis­as­ters re­quire some forethought. For in­stance, does ev­ery­one have a bug-out bag in case of an evac­u­a­tion? If there’s a hur­ri­cane, tor­nado or earth­quake and com­mu­ni­ca­tions are down, have an al­ter­nate way (such as a ham ra­dio) to con­tact peo­ple in your fam­ily. Ar­range for a place, per­haps an­other fam­ily mem­ber’s house, where ev­ery­one knows to meet up in such an event.

BUG­GING OUT

Bug-out sit­u­a­tions can hap­pen sud­denly and be se­vere, such as Hur­ri­cane Ka­t­rina. Al­ways keep enough gas in your ve­hi­cle’s tank to make it 100 miles or more if needed. In the event of an emer­gency, there will be a run on stores and gas sta­tions, so be ready be­fore­hand.

Make sure you have a de­cent amount of cash on hand: In case the power grid is tem­po­rar­ily down, you won’t have ac­cess to an ATM or be able to charge any­thing on a credit card. At a min­i­mum, $1,000 is a good start—and keep in mind that op­por­tunists will be price-goug­ing. Have tools, wa­ter and ex­tra food stored in your ve­hi­cle for those times a quick getaway is re­quired. Ev­ery­thing you do to pre­pare and plan mat­ters.

Ev­ery­thing dis­cussed here re­quires some money and time away from the ball game to get things in or­der. You might have to forego that nice fish­ing rod that’s been call­ing your name, or you might have to take a step down in price on your next firearm pur­chase.

Nev­er­the­less, all of that is worth it. After all, noth­ing is more im­por­tant than your fam­ily.

There are some folks who have a tough time mak­ing ends meet, so money is a scarcity. But money isn’t the main com­mod­ity for tak­ing care of your fam­ily and your­self. Lots of gear can be used in these sce­nar­ios that don’t re­quire co­pi­ous amounts of cash.

Be­sides, it’s plan­ning, prepa­ra­tion and ex­e­cu­tion that will make all the dif­fer­ence. That re­quires no money at all. It just re­quires love, sac­ri­fice and com­mit­ment.

What bet­ter “cur­rency” is there to spend to make sure your loved ones are safe? GW

… WE MUST BE PRE­PARED

THE BEST WE CAN AND HAVE PLANS IN PLACE TO TRY TO DEAL WITH ANY CON­TIN­GENCY.

Fact is, you can’t have one with­out the other. I’ll ad­mit, the laser was a tough sell at first. Didn’t think I needed the ex­tra help. Might have been the ego of my youth, but I’d be ly­ing if I said I wasn’t bet­ter with it. That’s why I’ve had Crim­son Trace on my 1911 for a decade now. It’s made right just like ev­ery­thing else I de­pend on: my truck, my busi­ness and my fam­ily. That means some­thing to me.

It takes just the blink of an eye for a fire to con­sume a home. Hav­ing a plan for such a con­tin­gency can mean the dif­fer­ence be­tween life and death. A ruggedi­zed ve­hi­cle is a solid

plan to get off the beaten path—away from crowds and

other po­ten­tial dan­gers.

I In the event of an at­tack or dis­as­ter,

it’s likely that com­mu­ni­ca­tions will

be down, mak­ing al­ter­na­tive types of com­mu­ni­ca­tion a vital

part of your plan.

In case the power grid goes down or there’s no ac­cess to an ATM, it’s good to have an emer­gency store of cash to quickly get the things you need to stay safe.

Get­ting chil­dren in­volved with first aid or home safety en­sures they know what to do in case some­thing se­ri­ous hap­pens.

Ready­ing an evac­u­a­tion kit(s) is a step for­ward in mak­ing sure your fam­ily can evac­u­ate the area im­me­di­ately.

In case of a nat­u­ral dis­as­ter, hav­ing a plan

in place in ad­vance for where fam­ily and friends should meet to re­group is ex­cel­lent

forethought.

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