LOCAL EXPLORER

Culi­nary ad­ven­turer and life­long Hamptons fan An­drew Zim­mern shares his thoughts on food and change—and his out­rage.

Hamptons Magazine - - Contents -

For a guy who has trav­eled the world on Bizarre Foods and De­li­cious Desti­na­tions, An­drew Zim­mern still en­joys our local fla­vor. “The East End is sin­gu­lar,” he says. “There’s noth­ing like it.” Zim­mern’s af­fec­tion for the area be­gan in childhood, and his memories have shaped the way he feels about food today.

How has the area changed? I re­mem­ber potato fields be­ing more dom­i­nant than Mc­man­sions. Old High­way 27, no traf­fic in town. Rudy at Dreesen’s mar­ket mar­veling at their first dough­nut con­veyor! Bonacker cul­ture is gone. What’s your fa­vorite sum­mer in­gre­di­ent? Mus­sels. My dad used to lower me by my an­kles as a kid into the jet­ties at Main Beach and Ge­or­gica; we’d cook them on the beach. What’s the worst thing you’ve eaten? I’ve en­joyed stew in tribal re­gions of Ecuador that had rab­bit shit cooked in it, so what do I know? Food cooked with no car­ing in it is most of­fen­sive. I’ve eaten food in Min­nesota at my son’s school that filled me with rage think­ing of the kids for whom un­healthy swill might be their best chance at a whole meal all day. Who’s on your din­ner guest bucket list? I’d like to cook a meal for refugees where con­di­tions are the worst, where the whole­some food we take for granted is an im­pos­si­ble dream. That keeps me up at night, be­cause I think no one cares about those folks. And I think I might be right.

ZIM­MERN’S CHILDHOOD MEMORIES OF THE EAST END HAVE SHAPED THE WAY HE FEELS ABOUT FOOD TODAY.

An­drew Zim­mern’s ciop­pino with mus­sels. INSET: “I’d like to cook a meal for refugees where the whole­some food we take for granted is an im­pos­si­ble dream,” the chef says.

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