PRE­VEN­TIVE AT­TACK MEA­SURES MAKE A PREDA­TOR PASS YOU BY

Home Defender - - Trends -

Hu­man predators, not un­like their an­i­mal coun­ter­parts out in the wild, prey upon the weak and dis­tracted. Hidden as­sailants will watch a crowd of peo­ple and find the vic­tim that will give them the least amount of trou­ble; it’s up to you to not be that per­son. Be­lieve it or not, there are sim­ple, com­mon-sense steps that you can take to en­sure just that.

BE AWARE OF YOUR SUR­ROUND­INGS

Although this idea is re­it­er­ated nearly ev­ery­where when deal­ing with a woman’s (or any­one’s) personal safety, it is of­ten the most ig­nored, even if un­in­ten­tion­ally. It in­cludes notic­ing who is around you, both on foot and in ad­ja­cent ve­hi­cles, spot­ting any­thing “out of place” within your nor­mal ev­ery­day work and home en­vi­ron­ments, and be­ing aware while in dark and un­known places like park­ing garages, out­door strip malls and city streets.

DON’T MULTI-TASK

Becoming dis­tracted is easy when you are jug­gling a smart­phone, car­ry­ing gro­cery bags, and find­ing your keys in your purse all at the same time. As such, you are a prime can­di­date for an at­tack by a thief or some­one out to do you harm. In­stead, fo­cus on one thing at a time.

Have your keys in your hand long be­fore you en­ter pos­si­ble “trou­ble” ter­ri­tory, and save the phone call for later. A dis­tracted per­son be­comes a vic­tim; don’t be that per­son.

USE BODY LAN­GUAGE

Body lan­guage can mean the dif­fer­ence be­tween you becoming a vic­tim or mak­ing it home safely at night. Look­ing down or be­ing hes­i­tant while walk­ing, or even look­ing up and all-around in­di­cat­ing you are lost, will at­tract the at­ten­tion of a preda­tor. Fix this by walk­ing con­fi­dently with your head up high, scan­ning the area in front of you and ex­hibit­ing a de­ter­mined look.

DON’T GO AT IT ALONE

The old adage, “there is safety in num­bers” is not false ad­ver­tis­ing, by any means. Trav­el­ing with one or two friends will se­verely de­crease your chances of becoming a vic­tim. In these cir­cum­stances, a would-be preda­tor will think twice about the idea of keep­ing con­trol of one or two other peo­ple while try­ing to over­come you. This would not be easy for him and as such, he will prob­a­bly pass you by for an­other, eas­ier vic­tim.

CALL FOR HELP

If some­thing just doesn’t “feel” right, don’t doubt your sixth sense. Call the po­lice im­me­di­ately. It’s bet­ter to be safe than sorry. When your life may be at stake, call­ing 911 is a smart thing to do. Your brain can log­i­cally con­vince you that you are over­re­act­ing, while your heart may sym­pa­thize for some­one who may be se­cretly out to harm you. Don’t lis­ten to ei­ther; trust your gut in­stinct and make the call to the po­lice.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.