FORE­FRONT

THE STATE OF THE UNION AD­DRESS IN HAR­LEY STUNTS

Hot Bike - - Contents - WORDS AND PHO­TOS: JOHN ZAMORA MODEL: CHRISTINA RIOR­DAN

The State of the Union Ad­dress in Har­ley Stunts ................................................... 24

HOT BIKE: HOW DID YOU GET STARTED DO­ING STUNTS?

ROGER RE­GAN: I’ve been do­ing wheel­ies about four years af­ter watch­ing Unknown videos on Youtube. I’ve been rid­ing dirt bikes since I was like five un­til about 17 when I got a Sport­ster. I got rid of the Sport­ster su­per quick and got a Dyna.

HB: WHAT’S THE HARD­EST PART OF WHEELYING A HAR­LEY?

RR: The hard­est part is stop­ping that tire from spin­ning. The bikes are su­per heavy, and the tire wants to spin when you don’t want to do it. I’ve got my setup down to a science. You have to main­tain them so they don’t break. When they do break, they cat­a­stroph­i­cally break and it’s ex­pen­sive. It’s not just a few plas­tic pieces; it’s a steel tank, steel fender, $1,500 shocks. It’s 700 pounds and when that thing hits the ground it’s break­ing things, not just scrap­ing things.

HB: WHAT DO YOU THINK KICKED OFF THE LAT­EST WAVE OF HAR­LEY STUNTS?

RR: Ev­ery­one’s been do­ing wheel­ies for­ever, but the pop­u­lar ver­sion or the sport started

about four years ago. So­cial media brought it out into the open and the abil­ity to see it on your phone. You can see Har­ley wheel­ies any­time if you’re into it.

HB: HAVE YOU AL­WAYS BEEN INTO FXRS?

RR: I’ve prob­a­bly had 25 FXRS. I buy them, put my lit­tle twist on them—like tall shocks, clutch, T-bars—and sell them. I sell them to peo­ple that want an FXR and get in the wheelie game. Right now I have a 2001 Dyna, 1993 FXR, 1989 Fxr—that’s it. All are set up for stunt and street.

HB: TELL US ABOUT THIS BIKE.

RR: That bike is named Old Glory. It’s a 1993 FXR. I like to say it’s a 2017 now be­cause every nut, bolt, bear­ing, and seal is brand new. It started when I had an old en­gine on my shelf. It was a rainy day and I got bored and tore it apart. I fig­ured if it was all apart I might as well do a color scheme. With the frame I didn’t want to go the cheap route by do­ing pow­der­coat, and my part­ner Matt said I bet­ter chrome that thing.

Next, I had a com­plete 1993 FXR. I put in on the rack and tore it down to pieces in about two hours. I had three bins lay­ing out in front of me. I started sep­a­rat­ing what I wanted red, what I wanted blue, and I wanted white, and off it went to pow­der­coat.

HB: WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE BIKE?

RR: I plan to use it for pro­mo­tional work for my shop Slab­sides in Camp­bell, Cal­i­for­nia. I just wanted to use it for ad­ver­tis­ing. I had only rid­den it for about 10 min­utes be­fore today, and I broke it in do­ing wheel­ies and burnouts. That’s kind of how I do it. Break it in how you’re go­ing to ride it. I’ll change the oil out a few times and it should be good to go.

HB: WHO DO YOU RIDE WITH?

RR: I’m part of Straight Up. Straight Up has been around for­ever. It was a sportbike team be­fore it was a Har­ley team. A cou­ple of the sportbike guys got Har­leys and re­cruited me, Scott Horton, Rickey, and Ryan Church. We started about two years ago and have been push­ing as a Har­ley team since then to get our name out there.

HB: WHAT’S YOUR UL­TI­MATE GOAL?

RR: The goal is to con­sis­tently be bet­ter and be on top, keep learn­ing new tricks, and be in the lime­light. I want to have peo­ple know what I’m do­ing and what I’m about.

HB: ANY LAST THOUGHTS?

RR: Spe­cial thanks to my girl­friend Melissa, Big Bear Chop­pers, Bung King, Bell Hel­mets, my own shop Slab­sides, my part­ner Matt, Öh­lins, Baker trans­mis­sion, Pro­gres­sive Sus­pen­sion, Onyx gloves, Alpines­tars, Heat Wave sun­glasses. I have a lot of day-one spon­sors that stuck with me even when I wasn’t good—i just looked good snap­ping pictures. The bet­ter I got, the more lime­light they got. I re­ally ap­pre­ci­ate those guys too. HB

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.