BAGGED

A POW­ER­FUL PAIR OF PD FXRPS

Hot Bike - - Contents - WORDS: JACK COOKSEY PHO­TOS: JOHN ZAMORA

A pow­er­ful pair of PD FXRPS ..................... 38

You spend many long nights on the in­ter­net search­ing all the many honey holes to come across these kinds of bikes. Then comes the race from Cal­i­for­nia through 10 states to Buf­falo, New York, to get this mint­con­di­tion 1989 FXRP. This one I trail­ered be­cause of the cold weather, un­like some of the other FXRPS, which were rid­den sight un­seen across the coun­try, wrench­ing and baby­ing them all the way to get them home. This bike was well cared for, garage kept, and hasn’t seen a bad day in its many years of be­ing rid­den. It started its jour­ney as a New York po­lice bike (Sgt. Bike)— pa­per­work like that is a big part of this bike’s his­tory.

This all-orig­i­nal FXRP was like none of the other ones I have pur­chased. When I saw this one I knew I had fi­nally done it. It’s all orig­i­nal paint and was the clean­est I’ve ever seen, from its per­fect chrome, all the way to the fac­tory bags that were flaw­less with their fac­tory keys.

I couldn’t wait to get this one back to Cal­i­for­nia and get out on it and ride. My first ride was around 350 miles of pure twists and two-lane high­ways. It was ev­ery­thing I thought it would be: The han­dling was like a dream, and the mo­tor was smooth and strong. I couldn’t wait to show this one off. It’s the per­fect orig­i­nal fac­tory FXRP that one could only dream of. This one is rare. You don’t al­ways find them all orig­i­nal, with all match­ing num­bers in amaz­ing con­di­tion. My hunt for FXRPS is still go­ing strong—it’s what I love to do. It’s my pas­sion of the chase to find the­ses true time cap­sules to share them with the mo­tor­cy­cle in­dus­try. Spe­cial thanks to AIP Speed for al­ways be­ing there for me.

My best friend Jack Cooksey wanted a 1994 FXRP for quite some time, but they were dif­fi­cult to find in orig­i­nal con­di­tion. One day at my pad when he was get­ting ready to book a flight to Min­nesota to get an FXRT he stum­bled upon an ad in Wash­ing­ton for the ex­act bike he wanted, a 1994 FXRP. When he got to Wash­ing­ton and saw the bike, it wasn’t as clean as he would have liked, and Jack al­most walked away from the deal and flew home. Thank­fully he didn’t, and he rode the bike back to South­ern Cal­i­for­nia, about 1,200 miles.

The bike was an orig­i­nal match­ing-num­bers Ge­or­gia State Pa­trol bike with a blue-and-sil­ver paint scheme (Ge­or­gia State col­ors). Clearly the old man who had it all those years rode the hell out of it. It was orig­i­nal but a lit­tle weath­ered. Jack was torn be­tween rid­ing it as is and let it patina or do a full frame off restoration; there was no mid­dle ground. He fi­nally de­cided on the lat­ter and we took it to AIP Speed but not be­fore Jack ripped a cou­ple wheel­ies out front. AIP is a well­re­spected fam­ily-run shop in Santa Clarita who built one of Jack’s pre­vi­ous bikes and a lot of our friends’ bikes as well.

The bike was stripped to the frame, and off it went to pow­der­coat with every other part that could be done. Jack de­cided on an S&S 111 mo­tor in­stead of re­build­ing the stock 80 af­ter some re­search and good re­views. The trans­mis­sion was fresh­ened up as well, and all bear­ings, bush­ings, mo­tor mounts, and so forth we changed. It took a cou­ple months, but it was well worth the wait. He had his dream bike, fi­nally!

Af­ter a month or two, Jack had some im­por­tant changes go­ing on in his life and made a very dif­fi­cult de­ci­sion to sell the bike. I knew how much he had in­vested in it fi­nan­cially and emo­tion­ally like a lot of us do. It broke my heart. I pur­chased the FXRP from Jack, he sold my ex­ist­ing bike, and I was able to re­turn the money to a friend within the month.

Around the same time, I changed the charg­ing sys­tem, in­stalled the Thun­der­header with mod­i­fi­ca­tions, re­placed the S&S “E” in­take with a “G” along with a pol­ished Mikuni 48, pulled all the mo­tor cov­ers and had

“THE BIKE WAS AN ORIG­I­NAL MATCH­ING-NUM­BERS GE­OR­GIA STATE PA­TROL BIKE WITH A BLUE-AND-SIL­VER PAINT SCHEME (GE­OR­GIA STATE COL­ORS). CLEARLY THE OLD MAN WHO HAD IT ALL THOSE YEARS RODE THE HELL OUT OF IT.”

them pow­der­coated since I was in­stalling a Woods Per­for­mance W6H cam, and in­stalled a Dyna 2000 ig­ni­tion. A Rivera Primo ring gear re­duc­tion kit, and Wel­don’s Spragg 90 starter clutch were also put in. I went with Big Al’s Nick Leonetti bend bars and the Bubba 10-inch pull­back ris­ers. The front end was re­built by Tony at 27 Cy­cles with Jimmy at Top Line Tubes do­ing the gold DLC coat­ing, with Race Tech springs and its gold valves.

While at Race Tech I picked up their pol­ished FXR axle ad­justers. I had Per­for­mance Ma­chine six-pis­ton front calipers and also a PM rear, so I hit up Paul at Lyn­dall Rac­ing Brakes for some crown-cut ro­tors and pads.

All in all, I’m re­ally happy with how this build turned out. It’s just the right com­bi­na­tion of orig­i­nal, per­for­mance parts, and bling for my taste. The ic­ing on the cake is that my best friend and I made it hap­pen. HB

FOR MORE ON THESE BIKES VISIT HOT­BIKE.COM

BE­HIND THE SCENES VIDEO ON­LINE HOT­BIKE.COM/GIRLS

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.