The Bike That Made The Kes­sel Run In Un­der 12 Par­secs

THE BIKE THAT MADE THE KES­SEL RUN IN UN­DER 12 PAR­SECS

Hot Bike - - Contents - WORDS: BRYAN FULLER PHO­TOS: STEVE WEST

Imet a gen­tle­man in Canada at one of the big shows up there called the At­lantic Na­tion­als. The guy asked me to build him a bike sim­i­lar to one of the “Right­eous Fueller” we had built that year. After com­ing to an agree­ment, we came home and started the bike. The Fueller, for those of you who don’t re­mem­ber, is a com­bi­na­tion of Fuller and Buell. The first was done for Biker Build-off, and this is the last of the run of five. On all of these bikes, we started with an XB-12. Us­ing the front end, brakes, bear­ings, en­gine and trans assem­bly, and wiring com­po­nents, we’re able to take an Amer­i­can sport­bike and put it into more of a cruiser rid­ing po­si­tion. These bikes are fast and fun!

The frames are made of 4130 chrome-moly cus­tom for each of the five cus­tomers. Most of the brack­ets were cut on our Mul­ti­cam wa­ter jet, and the bungs were CNC lathed. We made our own wheels and hubs, which are one of the cooler pieces we be­lieve. They’re de­signed around the stock ro­tor, caliper, bear­ings, and front end of the stock Buell but in a 21-inch size. This way we can use their brakes right off the shelf. Re­place­ment com­po­nents are easy to get also, as they need to be re­placed over time.

With the Mil­len­nium we de­cided to do some­thing different: twin-spar frame tubes lead­ing up the back­bone. The idea was to bring the in­take straight up like the stock Buell did and make a cool-look­ing stack com­ing up through the tank. Good idea so far, right? The prob­lem with this setup is that the en­tire vi­su­als of the tank area are de­fined by these two frame tubes. Any­thing you do with the sheet metal is de­fined and over­taken with these tubes.

Once we had a roller, it was time to work on sheet metal. Our cus­tomer was will­ing to do this project all the way, so we wanted to get it right. I felt con­flicted on how to do that, so I de­cided to use mod­el­ing clay as OEMS do. Au­to­mo­tive mod­el­ing clay al­lows you to change shapes, pro­por­tions, and lines very quickly. You can ab­so­lutely get ev­ery­thing ex­actly the way you like be­fore head­ing into metal or some kind of com­pos­ite.

I’ve been do­ing de­sign lately at my home garage. It al­lows me to sketch, doo­dle, and clay in the morn­ing, evening, and week­end around be­ing a dad. My di­rec­tion ini­tially with the style was to mimic the sur­faces of Star Wars ships like the Mil­len­nium Fal­con. I love how they look fu­tur­is­tic but fa­mil­iar. Un­for­tu­nately, ev­ery time I went that di­rec­tion, it just didn’t look right. Fi­nally I started down a path I liked and went with it. About 150 hours or so later, I had one side fin­ished in clay ready for re­pro­duc­tion in metal.

Bryan Heidt, a.k.a. Su­perb, has been at Fuller Moto for about nine years now. He’s a very com­pe­tent builder and has a good eye for style. He took the clay pieces apart and pat­terned each one then shaped them piece by piece in steel. We con­sid­ered alu­minum as we usu­ally do, but there were so many in­tri­cate shapes, and rigid-mounted Har­leys shake so much, so steel be­came the choice.

I par­tic­u­larly like how the scoop un­der the frame turned out. That was a re­ally hard part to de­sign and build. One side is the func­tional scoop, while the coils are mounted hid­den within the other side.

With the bike fin­ished in bare metal, I needed to pick fin­ishes for the body­work. The cus­tomer and I liked black. I wanted some­thing in­ter­est­ing to pop. I was up one night late, toil­ing, watch­ing Kate Beck­in­sale in the Un­der­world movies when it hit me. In fact, I watched two in a row be­ing mes­mer­ized by that out­fit of hers! Here’s the idea! I called the owner and said, “Let’s cover the sheet metal and make it look like Kate Beck­in­sale’s bum! Leather and lace!” He loved it!

As for the head­light, it’s also steel with a cus­tom-made light hous­ing and plexi shield. We made a mold then warmed the plexi, mak­ing a drape form. In­te­rior LED hold­ers were made of alu­minum and pol­ished. Wes Hines at Fuller Moto wired and plumbed the “Mil­len­nium” up all nice and tidy. She sounds nasty!

“MY DI­REC­TION INI­TIALLY WITH THE STYLE WAS TO MIMIC THE SUR­FACES OF STAR WARS SHIPS LIKE THE MIL­LEN­NIUM FAL­CON. I LOVE HOW THEY LOOK FU­TUR­IS­TIC BUT FA­MIL­IAR.”

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