BLUE COLLAR LUX­URY

HEATH PIN­TER’S 2018 STREET BOB CON­CEPT

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Heath Pin­ter’s 2018 Street Bob Con­cept ...................................................

when Har­ley-david­son gave cer­tain in­dus­try folk the all-new Sof­tail last year, it knew full well that, as a trade-off, it would also be giv­ing each of them a leg up over their af­ter­mar­ket-parts com­pe­ti­tion on new-prod­uct R&D. Ten or so years ago, that might’ve been a big­ger deal. These days, how­ever, the ma­jor deal­er­ships have prod­ucts from those afore­men­tioned folks for sale right next to their gen­uine H-D mo­tor and ac­ces­sory parts.

But at the end of the day, we all know whose parts Har­ley-david­son prefers sell­ing: gen­uine H-D. And this is where Heath Pin­ter en­tered the pic­ture back when the crates be­gan to drop. Heath’s a skilled bike builder, but his rid­ing skills—whether it’s in the dirt, the park, or the lo­cal se­cret spot—are out of this world.

The freestyle BMX world, that is. When it comes to mo­tor­ized bikes, on the other hand, he’s spent more time twist­ing throt­tles than turn­ing wrenches on them (usu­ally be­cause his tools are busy get­ting turned on one of his Model A Fords, early Chevy pick­ups, etc.). But Heath’s got an eye for style and had been itch­ing to ap­ply some of his ideas to the new Har­ley Sof­tail plat­form—us­ing much of The Mo­tor Com­pany’s own bolt-on of­fer­ings (mas­saged a bit) rather than cus­tom fab­ri­cate parts on his own. And Har­ley agreed.

Heath’s vi­sion with his 2018 Street Bob wasn’t to cre­ate some­thing en­tirely dif­fer­ent from what it started out as, but rather, a mod­er­ately and taste­fully cus­tom­ized bike—an at­tain­able in­spi­ra­tion for po­ten­tial new buyers who want to “roll their own”… right off the show­room floor. Here’s how he de­scribes it: “My strong­est in­flu­ence in build­ing this new bike was to sim­ply fol­low the lines the de­sign team al­ready put in place. By us­ing Har­ley-david­son’s in­tu­itive web­site to ini­tially choose parts that are en­gi­neered to fit the new Street Bob, a new cus­tomer can take ad­van­tage of H-D’S abil­ity to roll gen­uine mo­tor and ac­ces­sory parts and in­stal­la­tion into the fi­nanc­ing, giv­ing the buyer the flex­i­bil­ity to cre­ate a cus­tom mo­tor­cy­cle within their bud­get—and the peace of mind that comes with the man­u­fac­turer’s war­ranty.”

As you’ll see, Heath took that con­cept a step fur­ther, putting his own per­sonal touch in some ar­eas to com­ple­ment the off-the-shelf add-ons.

“MY STRONG­EST IN­FLU­ENCE IN BUILD­ING THIS NEW BIKE WAS TO SIM­PLY FOL­LOW THE LINES THE DE­SIGN TEAM AL­READY PUT IN PLACE.”

But in do­ing so, he kept the mod­i­fi­ca­tions within the pa­ram­e­ters of the av­er­age hands-on en­thu­si­ast’s ca­pa­bil­i­ties. Well, mostly. While the in­stru­men­ta­tion-in­clu­sive sheet­metal fair­ing is a lit­tle higher on the dif­fi­culty me­ter, it’s a de­sign el­e­ment that of­fers vis­ual and func­tional ben­e­fits (it, along with the up­dated front fender, was painted by Hil­lview Cus­toms; the tank was re­done by Air­trix). And his sub­tle dash is just bitchin’. The var­i­ous com­po­nents used from the De­fi­ance line of H-D parts do just what they were in­tended to do: get bolted on and en­hance the nearly blacked-out chas­sis con­trols and M-8 power plant, which was de­liv­ered in 107-inch fac­tory form to Quaid Har­ley-david­son but left with a 114-inch war­ranty-re­tain­ing Scream­ing Ea­gle Stage IV kit, among other things. Heath capped off the larger 64 mm throt­tle body with an S-E Ex­treme Flow breather (fin­ished off with a cus­tom mesh outer), but in lieu of the dual H-D Street Can­non ex­haust up­grade, he opted for a Fab28 In­dus­tries 2-into-1 in black Cer­akote. Ad­di­tion­ally, he uti­lized Biltwell’s Tracker bars mounted off Gordo ris­ers, Klock Werks’ Top Hat front fender, and rear light­ing com­po­nents from Ri­zoma. Fi­nally, although not items you’ll likely ever get an up-sell pitch on, the seat as well as the wheels are gen­uine H-D. How­ever, Heath thinned and stretched out the stock Street Bob solo (re­cov­ered in pat­tern­matched leather by his friend Joe) and back-dated the rolling stock with a set of en­larged-bear­ing nine-spokes from the de­funct Dyna.

I ad­mire and ap­pre­ci­ate one­off de­sign con­cepts as much—if not more—than the next guy. But some­times you need more than just in­spi­ra­tion to get your mo­tor run­nin’, and that’s just what Heath Pin­ter ac­com­plished with his 2018 Street Bob: a cus­tom­ized Har­ley for the av­er­age man who wants it on a pay­ment plan!

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