11 EL­E­MENTS OF THE HU­MAN BODY*

iD magazine - - Questions & Answers -

HOW LONG CAN A HEART SUR­VIVE WITH­OUT A HU­MAN?

Un­til re­cently hu­man donor hearts could only be cooled for a short amount of time be­fore they had to be trans­planted. Now a new stor­age sys­tem al­lows a heart to be re­an­i­mated and sub­se­quently kept alive. To achieve this the heart is kept in a spe­cial con­tainer and sup­plied with blood, oxy­gen, and nu­tri­ents via hoses. In this way it can con­tinue to beat un­til it reaches the pa­tient. So far there have been 15 in­stances of the “heart in a box” be­ing suc­cess­fully kept alive af­ter the donor had died. In the fu­ture this method may sig­nif­i­cantly in­crease the num­ber of heart trans­plants done per year.

Can ad­dicts get clean by play­ing Tetris?

Re­searchers at Ply­mouth Univer­sity in the UK have re­cently dis­cov­ered that Tetris can help re­duce a per­son’s ur­gent crav­ing for al­co­hol, choco­late, or ci­garettes. Test sub­jects in­di­cated that their de­sire for drugs or other plea­sur­able sub­stances was dra­mat­i­cally re­duced af­ter they had played the game. The sci­en­tific ex­pla­na­tion: The puz­zle-based video game keeps the brain so oc­cu­pied that not much room re­mains for the idea of con­sum­ing any­thing. (Study re­sults even ex­tended to the urge for sex and sleep.) In the fu­ture the “Tetris Ef­fect” could aid in hard drug– with­drawal ther­apy.

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