Lux­em­bourg, At the Helm of As­ter­oid Min­ing

Chi­nese coun­tries lack the suf­fi­cient in­frastr e-waste gen­er­ated end up in back­yards, tras harms the en­vi­ron­ment. Ruc­ture to carry out e-re­cy­cling and so most of the h fires, or in­for­mal re­cy­cling sys­tems which ul­ti­mately

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With the de­vel­op­ment of tech­nol­ogy comes the in­creas­ing im­pact of its ben­e­fits as well as draw­backs. As gad­gets are not an as­set any­more, they are eas­ily avail­able to a ma­jor­ity of the peo­ple across the world. Ear­lier own­ing a gad­get was con­sid­ered a nov­elty but now it’s the other way round, the per­son who doesn’t own a gad­get is the black sheep of so­ci­ety. For this and a few other rea­sons, not only is the pur­chase of gad­gets high but also its dis­posal. The dump­ing of such elec­tronic gad­gets is known as e-waste. Ac­cord­ing to re­cent re­ports, the e-waste in Asia has risen con­sid­er­ably in the past five years.

The term e-waste stands for dis­carded or dis­posed of elec­tronic de­vices. Due to affordability and short life span of the gad­gets, peo­ple tend to up­date their gad­gets at reg­u­lar time in­ter­vals. This re­sults in e-waste gen­er­a­tion. In case

th­ese de­vices are not re­cy­clable, one usu­ally burns or washes them in acid. By do­ing so, cop­per and other such met­als can be ex­tracted. This process is one of the fac­tors caus­ing air and wa­ter pol­lu­tion. The work­ers in­volved in this process might suf­fer from cancer or in­fer­til­ity. If cer­tain gad­gets are not el­i­gi­ble for this process, they are sim­ply dumped on land. In ad­di­tion to this, it causes land pol­lu­tion as well. There­fore e-waste has be­come a grow­ing con­cern due to its wide­spread na­ture.

For the new re­port, re­searchers at the United Na­tions Uni­ver­sity closely stud­ied e-waste gen­er­a­tion in 12 coun­tries specif­i­cally in East and South­East Asia. This re­port stated that the e-waste gen­er­ated in th­ese

coun­tries rose by 63 per­cent be­tween 2010 and 2015. The re­port has also put down sev­eral rea­sons which led to this in­crease. China was one of th­ese 12 coun­tries which pro­duced more than dou­ble of its usual out­put which was 22 pounds of waste per per­son per year. But the re­gion pro­duc­ing the high­est amount of e-waste in Asia is Hong Kong. By 2015 ap­proached, Hong Kong was pro­duc­ing nearly 48 pounds of waste per per­son per year. On the other hand, the Cam­bo­di­ans hardly pro­duced 3 pounds of waste per per­son per year. There is no par­tic­u­lar so­lu­tion to avoid the pol­lu­tion caused by such e-waste. In gen­eral, the Asian coun­tries lack suf­fi­cient in­fras­truc­ture to carry out e-re­cy­cling. Be­cause of this, most of the e-waste gen­er­ated end up in back­yards, trash fires, or in­for­mal re­cy­cling sys­tems which ul­ti­mately harms the en­vi­ron­ment. Hence in or­der to cut down on the harm­ful ef­fects of e-waste in Asia, one needs to de­velop e-re­cy­cling sys­tems like the ones present in Ja­pan, South Korea, and Tai­wan or try to re­duce reg­u­lar dis­posal of gad­gets.

There is no par­tic­u­lar so­lu­tion to avoid the pol­lu­tion caused by e-waste.

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